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From time to time I hear teachers of english say that " There is no need to use the passive form of the Perfect Progressive Tenses" Sometimes I wanted to know why but nobody answered me. will you gently answer me if there is a logical reason.
thanks in advance
Ayman
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Hi Ayman, just wingin' it on this one. WELCOME TO THE FORUMS ! !

It looks to me that transforming the present perfect progressive from active voice to passive voice comes out with the same result as doing it to the present perfect. That is, the progressive aspect of it seems to get lost in the process.

He has been stealing light bulbs from the company for years. (present perfect progressive - active voice)

Light bulbs have been stolen by him from the company for years. (passive transformation)

He has stolen light bulbs from the company for years. (present perfect - active voice)

Light bulbs have been stolen by him from the company for years. (passive transformation) Same thing. I don't see any way to preserve the "progressive" nature of the tense.

Best wishes, - A.

P.S. Was that gentle enough? I just hope I'm right!

I woul like to thank you Avangi because you answer was really persuading and it is the first time to recieve an answer to the question which I have been asking for years. Thanks again

Ayman

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PS - Avangi will kick himself when he realizes he forgot to say this, but welcome to the forums.

Also, think how awkward the form would be:

Lightbulbs have been being stolen. Ugh.

If you want, I can make up a story so that it would fit, but only if you want to emphasize a duration of something in the past AND not name the person doing it would you use this form.
AvangiHe has been stealing light bulbs from the company for years. (present perfect progressive - active voice)

Light bulbs have been stolen by him from the company for years. (passive transformation)
Not quite.
Light bulbs have been being stolen ..., as GG says.
It's a bit awkward, so it's not used much, but there is no rule against it, and you will occasionally encounter it.
We've been being bitten by mosquitoes all summer long.
English has been being spoken more and more throughout the world since World War II.

People have been being laid off every month for two years, and management has still not completed its downsizing.
CJ
Hi,

It looks to me that transforming the present perfect progressive from active voice to passive voice comes out with the same result as doing it to the present perfect. That is, the progressive aspect of it seems to get lost in the process.

He has been stealing light bulbs from the company for years. (present perfect progressive - active voice)

Light bulbs have been stolen by him from the company for years. (passive transformation)

Actually, you can say 'Light bulbs have been being stolen by him from the company for years'. However, such continuous passive forms are less common. As you can see, they tend to be rather long and awkkward.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks Jim. Someone posted on another site, "Is there a sentence anywhere in the world with the combination have been being?" I was feeling about the same, but there are 367,000 hits with "has" and another 123,000 with "have." Granted, many are grammar sites, but many are not. a 14 year old girl wrote, "I have been being very moody lately." Some guy wrote, "I have been being chased by black entities." Another, "Someone has been being really really mean." If you let these sink in a while, they almost start to sound natural.

How do I break the news to my poor questioner?

Best wishes, - A.

Edit. Thanks also to GG and Clive.

Edit. Edit. I just realized that only the black entity example is really passive.
AvangiI just realized that only the black entity example is really passive.
True, but if you keep hunting on Google, you'll find a lot more that are really passive.
CJ
AvangiThanks Jim. Someone posted on another site, "Is there a sentence anywhere in the world with the combination have been being?" I was feeling about the same, but there are 367,000 hits with "has" and another 123,000 with "have." Granted, many are grammar sites, but many are not. a 14 year old girl wrote, "I have been being very moody lately." Some guy wrote, "I have been being chased by black entities." Another, "Someone has been being really really mean." If you let these sink in a while, they almost start to sound natural.
CalifJim
AvangiI just realized that only the black entity example is really passive.
True, but if you keep hunting on Google, you'll find a lot more that are really passive. CJ
In resurrecting this I discovered there are 115 hits for "been being" on our EF search engine. I'm sure I never heard it growing up in New England.

Nevertheless, I feel duty-bound to report that I heard it last night ad libitum from a caller on a radio talk show. I couldn't believe it. This has already been being done. Has anyone come across anything like this, other than in a grammar book?

Another one I never heard in New England, but heard as an adult in the midwest: "If I would have known you were coming, I would have baked a cake." In that area it seemed to be the preferred version - by well-spoken people! Is it actually correct??

- A.
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