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We shall now describe the process whereby the plan of the process is effective.

which is supposed to mean:

We shall now describe the process through which the plan of the process has the intended effects.

The process has the same effects as the plan of the process in the end.

Is this alright or any mistake? Why is it not correct?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Now that I think of it, it should have been:

Plan = "send in the cops" and "prosecute all criminals"

Process = "the authority arresting the criminals" and "prosecuting all the criminals"

Effect of the plan = "crime reduction"

Effect of the process = "crime reduction"
AlexandreAnotherI think he is wrong however:

I don't think they mean the same thing.
"Implemented" and "fulfilled" mean to me about the same as you friends suggestion, "effected."
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I totally agree: "The process by which the plan will be effected" DOES make complete sense. It means "Here's how we're going to get our plan in motion."
By the way, this sentence is from New York Times:

The plan will have the effect of centralizing reserves and making them available.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9A0DE7D8113EE233A2575BC1A9679C946096D6CF
Avangi
AlexandreAnotherI think he is wrong however:

I don't think they mean the same thing.
"Implemented" and "fulfilled" mean to me about the same as you friends suggestion, "effected."

No, I agree. In fact, that's what I said.

We shall now describe the process through which the plan is implemented

=

We shall now describe the steps to take through which the plan is fulfilled.
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I think the problem is that you want to use some of these words in ways which are unnatural to "native speakers."

"Plan" and "process" are hoplessly muddled together.

We have big plans and little plans - master plans and sub plans "plan A" plans and "plan B" plans.

You sometimes use the word "intent." where we would probably use "purpose." We usually think of "plans" as abstract, but every plan has a purpose. You may say "the intent of the plan," but "the purpose of the plan" is more natural. We typically attribute "intent" to a person, and "purpose" to a plan, although they may certainly be reversed.

A "plan" and a "process" are a lot alike. Both take us from point A to point B with the idea that something will be different after the procedure has been consumated. You could characterize this change as the "result" or the "effect" of the "plan," or of the "process."

But while this result/effect of our "plan" may or may not be called its "purpose," the result/effect of our "process" would more likely be called its "outcome."

A process may well be an integral part of our plan, but it's less likely we'd say that a plan is an integral part of our process - although it's certainly possible.

"Effect" has many uses, and I think it has greatly contributed to the confusion here. We'd say a plan has been "put into effect," meaning "set in motion," or, in some cases, "implemented." We'd be less likely to say that a process has been put into effect, although we might well say "the process has been set in motion."

We also use "effect" in talking about plans and processes through the concept of "cause and effect," meaning A causes B, and B is the effect of A. Usually when we say something is "effective," we're talking about something entirely different. Onions are effective in curing warts. Of course it's possible to say that a plan or a process is effective, meaning it is operational (not necessarily "fulfilled"), much as we'd say "The 55mph speed limit is now effective," meaning it now obtains, or is being enforced - not that it's having "a good effect."

You may continue to insist on using "effect" in your sentence, but I think you do so at your own peril.

If you don't have a particular scenario in mind, or if you don't wish to reveal the real one, I'd suggest that you try to come up with another "dummy" scenario which accurately reflects the relationships between all the elements. Then we can have another try at this.