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I was brought up in a home where my parents were always around.
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That is perfect informal English. It is the way anybody would put it without thinking. In formal writing, however, it is safer not to use "where" to mean "in which".

Thanks, but I’ve never thought that “where” is informal English.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
teacherJapan Thanks, but I’ve never thought that “where” is informal English.

It isn't strictly informal. "Where" as "in which" is frowned upon by some. To my ear, it sounds a bit loose, and I would avoid it in the most formal settings. But it is perfectly fine everyday English, I use it myself all the time, and I daresay most people wouldn't even know what I was talking about. The American Heritage Dictionary has a usage note about it at https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=where .

Of course, we are not talking about all uses of "where" but only uses like this: "Marriage is an institution where two people make a lifelong commitment to one another."

Thank you so much, anonym9ous.