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I have found this sample letter in this link http://www.4hb.com/letters/ltrcongachi.html

I feel some grammatical errors are there in the center paragaraph. can any body throw some light?

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You have proven the skeptics wrong and accomplished what
most said was impossible.

There is no doubt that your recent achievements will be
spoken of for some time to come and that the admiration
for your accomplishments is felt by all of us within the
industry as well as the general public.

Please accept my heartiest congratulations for your success.

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Comments  
Fine to me. What "errors" do you have in mind?
Please accept my heartiest congratulations for your success.

In BrE, it should be 'congratulations on ... "

I remember having read that the preposition is 'for' in AmE.
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Yoong LiatPlease accept my heartiest congratulations for your success.

In BrE, it should be 'congratulations on ... "

I remember having read that the preposition is 'for' in AmE.

You're right on this one. Even in AmE, "for" is less used, though correct.

See the New York Times:

"congratulations for your" 6 Results
"congratulations on your" 95 Results
You have proven the skeptics wrong and accomplished what
most said was impossible.

In BrE 'proved' is the more common form for the past participle of 'prove'. I would say that 'proven' is AmE.
Americans also use "proved" for the past participle. I've noticed that the news anchors on the CBS network tend to use "have proved", for example. In everyday conversation I hear "have proven" a lot.

CJ
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In BrE, 'proven' is also an adjective: a student of proven ability.

A person is innocent unless s/he is proven guilty. I believe this is BrE. Is it also used in AmE?
unless / until proven guilty is certainly used in AmE, yes!

proven is used as an adjective in AmE, yes!

CJ
Yoong LiatIn BrE, 'proven' is also an adjective: a student of proven ability.
A person is innocent unless s/he is proven guilty. I believe this is BrE. Is it also used in AmE?

In both AmE or BrE, the [is + past participle ] construction can be viewed as either passive or adjective.

For over three decades, the Boeing 747’s safety record has been proven as the safest plane ever built. – Passive

The Boeing 747’s proven safety record for the past three decades has earned itself the honor for best airplane ever built.- Adjective
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.