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Hi,

I think I did use this clause to ask a question before but allow me to use the same one to ask a different question.

Is this the subjunctive?

even if it take a long time to do.
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The Choice
by William Butler Yeats

The intellect of man is forced to choose
perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse
A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
When all that story's finished, what's the news?
In luck or out the toil has left its mark:
That old perplexity an empty purse,
Or the day's vanity, the night's remorse.
The missing s on take is a sign of the subjunctive, yes.
However, the use of the subjunctive after if hardly ever occurs anymore in modern English.

CJ
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CalifJimThe missing s on take is a sign of the subjunctive, yes.
However, the use of the subjunctive after if hardly ever occurs anymore in modern English.

CJ
Hi, CJ,

Could it refer to, by any chance, a conditional if in the case of the poem "The Choice"?

Second, I'm bewildered by your line I highlighted in blue. Would you shed more light?

Thanks.
We use subjunctive mood to express somethig desirable, possible, hypothetic.

if suggests something hypothetic or desirable will follow

"However, the use of the subjunctive after if hardly ever occurs anymore in modern English."

It means the occurence of subjunctive in Modern English is not common anymore
Inchoateknowledge
We use subjunctive mood to express somethig desirable, possible, hypothetic.

if suggests something hypothetic or desirable will follow

"However, the use of the subjunctive after if hardly ever occurs anymore in modern English."

It means the occurence of subjunctive in Modern English is not common anymore

Thanks, Incho, for the feedback.

Yet, my first question is still missed.

Second, I'm still puzzled by your line in blue.

Have the following samples with if hardly ever occurred any more in modern English?

1. If it should rain tomorrow, we would cancel our picnic.

2. If I were you, I wouldn't go so far as to say that.

3. If I had studied harder when young, I would be a doctor now.

Would you shed more light, thanks.

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If it should rain tomorrow, we would cancel our picnic. -- subjunctive

2. If I were you, I wouldn't go so far as to say that. -- subjunctive

3. If I had studied harder when young, I would be a doctor now. -- no subjunctive mood here

They are okay

but more frequent are

If it should rained tomorrow, we would cancel our picnic.

If I was you, I wouldn't go so far as to say that. -- actually, with the was/were here, I feel the subjunctive form is still more common
Hi, Incho,

I think I'm losing you. Don't you understand my questions?
Sorry, put it again.

"However, the use of the subjunctive after if hardly ever occurs anymore in modern English."

What is it that puzzles you seeing the sentence?

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