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The news of his resignation was music to my ears.
Is this usage common?
I ask so , because I am afraid that people may not understand what I am talking about when I use this expression.

Is this sentence correct?
His being expelled from school is music to my ears.

Many thanks in advance
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Yes, "music to my ears" is a well-known idiom that all native speakers will understand (at least, it is British English).
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Vctory Ong
His being expelled from school is music to my ears.

His moving to downstairs is music to my ears.

Are these two sentences right?

They're OK after the correction noted, but there is a slight awkwardness about the juxtaposition of the formal "His being..."/"His moving" and the informal or idiomatic "music to my ears".
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Well, in conversation, people might well say "Him being/moving...". I'm not sure I should be recommending this form to you though, since purists would say it's ungrammatical. I'd definitely avoid it in more formal writing.

To avoid the not-very-conversational "His being/moving", you could also say:

"His expulsion from school is music to my ears."

"His move downstairs is music to my ears."

In formal writing you could replace "music to my ears" with any of a number of expressions. For example:

"His being expelled from school pleases me greatly."

"His moving downstairs is a welcome relief."

Both sentences can be rewritten in umpteen different ways. For example, "I'm delighted to hear that he's being/been expelled", "It's great news that he's moving/moved downstairs", etc. etc.

Keep in mind, though, that your originals are not actually wrong.
Comments  
Thanks,

His being expelled from school is music to my ears.
His moving to downstairs is music to my ears.

Are these two sentences right?
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If something that you hear is music to your ears, it makes you feel very happy.

The news of his resignation makes you feel very happy.

His being expelled from school makes you feel very happy.

If that is what you mean, the sentences are correct.
 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks,
Would you please help me to change them into another types of expressions?
Informal ones
And formal ones

I think it will help me to improve my skill of making sentences.
I actually have no ideas of how to changing them, I hope to learn from your ways of changing.
Many thanks in advance
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 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
Good advice from Mr Wordy.

I'll just add that the expression is quite common in the US as well.
Vctory OngWould you please help me to change them into another types of expressions?
You can use "it was music to my ears" before or after "when I heard that ...", like this:

It was music to my ears when I heard that Mr. Torquemada resigned.
When I heard that Mr. Torquemada resigned, it was music to my ears.

It was music to my ears when I heard that Bully McPunk was expelled from school.
When I heard that Bully McPunk was expelled from school, it was music to my ears.

CJ
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