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Dear friends
Recently i started to observe that many native speakers are fusing some words together and talking.For example:
Got to-->Gotcha.
Want to-->Wanna.
You all-->Yall.
Have to-->Have to.

As a non-native speaker and still in the beginning of my English learning curve, can i adopt those fused words in to my language or is it better to avoid them now or even forever.
Will you advice me on this issue.Thank you.
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Comments  
David, do NOT use these in your writing unless you are writing dialogue. It's how we say it, but not how people who want to be taken seriously write it.

(Got to is "gotta" not "gotcha." Gotha is its own word. Did you mean "hafta"?)

But don't say "Y'all" unless you truly have roots in the southern part of the U.S No one else will sound natural saying it.
Hi,

Recently i started to observe that many native speakers are fusing some words together and talking.For example:
Got to-->Gotcha. Gotta
Want to-->Wanna.
You all-->Yall. This seems a regional version. Where I live,we say (approximately) 'Yeh all'
Have to-->Have to. Hafta

As a non-native speaker and still in the beginning of my English learning curve, can i adopt those fused words in to my language or is it better to avoid them now or even forever.

It depends on your goal.

If you want to understand native speakers, you need to understand these versions when you hear them. If you want to sound like a native speaker, you need to use them in your speech.

On the other hand, perhaps you just want to talk to other non-native speakers, in which case it may not be so important.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you very much Grammar Geek and Clive.

Hi David,
yeah, GG and Clive are right. Don't write those in formal English, but for informal English you definitely HAVE TO learn them. ---> hafta learn 'em / there you go, you also got a new one, 'em. Emotion: wink

I'd just like to add a little thing. I was told "have to", when it means "must", is always pronounced "haff to" and it can't be pronounced "have to". If that's true, then "haff to" is not a reduction at all, but it is just the right way to pronounce "have to". Do any natives pronunce "have to" with a V sound? (when "have to" is "must")

Emotion: smile

Hi Clive,

Note that not all native speakers speak like that.
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Hi,

What kind of people are you thinking of? Are they, for example, related to particular geographical locations, or to levels of education?

Clive
Looking at my last post, are there any natives who sometimes pronunce "have to" with a V sound instead of "haff to"? I was told that's the correct pronunciation, not a reduction.

PS: that anon was not me. I think every American uses those reduction at least in a few situations and contexts. Unless we are talking about 90-year-olds, lol. I guess some old people don't even tap their T's. Emotion: smile
Hi Kooyeen,

Your point is well taken. However, I think the V sound can be heard to some extent as speaking becomes slower and more careful. Such pronunciation forms a continuum, it's not just a case of 'either one way or the other'.

Clive.
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