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They didn't want people staring at them as they sat on the lawn, so they put up high walls.

I want my car this colour.

..And remember, we want him alive.


May I take it that

They didn't want people to be staring at them as they sat on the lawn, so they put up high walls.

I want my car to be this colour.

..And remember, we want him to be alive.

If so, could it be that those omissions are optional?

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anonymousThey didn't want people staring at them as they sat on the lawn, so they put up high walls.

That is the better version.

anonymousI want my car to be this colour.

That is the better version.

anonymous..And remember, we want him alive.

The other version has a different meaning.

Comments  

It is as though "to be" has been omitted in the first two, but I am reluctant to say that that is what is happening. English is not so cut and dried. "People staring" has a right to exist without "to be", and "want" seems to have the "to be" built in, especially in the last one. Wanted posters say "wanted dead or alive". Mick Jagger wrote "I see a red door, and I want it painted black."

anonymousIf so, could it be that those omissions are optional?

The first one sounds odd with "to be" in it. The second is perhaps better with "to be". The third is also possible as an emphatic way of putting it.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.