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* The original sentence was:

If you enter wrong(incorrect) PIN three times in succession, it is blocked.

* And I touched a little bit of it and made:

If you enter the wrong PIN three times in a row, it will be blocked.

Don't you think it should be 'will be blocked' instead of 'is blocked' even though it is stating the general information?

Because... the blocking part will happen after entering process. It's very tricky to someone like me..

And I don't quite understand what 'in succession' means here. Does that mean like, while trying to succeed in entering the PIN?

Like 'in a row' or 'consecutive'?

Thank you in advance!
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In succession does mean in a row or consecutively. Its meaning is not related to succeed or to success.

Your corrected sentence is far better, but has a problem that many native speakers also have with their writing, and that is that the "it" doesn't refer to anything that came before in the sentence. "It" isn't you, and "it" isn't the PIN. Presumably, it's either access to your account or your account itself. So the best sentence of all is "If you enter the wrong PIN three times in a row, access to your account will be blocked." (And it would be nice if you also told the person what to do to get a PIN reset, or whatever. But that's the technical writer in me, not that grammar geek.)
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Hello Jenthecute

In answer to your question about the use of the present tense:

1. If you enter the wrong PIN three times in a row, your card will be locked.

2. If you enter the wrong PIN three times in a row, your card is locked.

You would be more likely to use the #1 structure if you wanted to explain the consequences of something, for instance in an instruction manual: "if you do A, B will happen." It's what some grammar books call a "type 1 conditional".

The #2 version involves a slightly different use of "if". Here, "if" means "whenever", i.e.

3. Whenever you enter the wrong PIN three times in a row, your card is locked.

You would be more likely to use this structure if you wanted to express a general principle or make a general observation: "if A happens, B happens." It's what some grammar books call a type '0' conditional.

With your example, however, there isn't a great difference in meaning between the two versions. I doubt whether anyone would notice which one you used.

MrP
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THANK YOU VERY MUCH Grammar Geek!! :->

have a great one!! muah!
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