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What do these mean?

1. One day is he going to come in here and he is going to be like 'Clean your room up!'.
2. One day is he going to come in here and he will be like 'Clean your room up!' .
3. One day is he going to come in here and he would be like 'Clean your room up!' .

Thanks.
Comments  
Are you sure that the sentences are not,

1. One day HE IS going to come in here and IT is going to be like 'Clean your room up!'.
2. One day HE IS going to come in here and IT will be like 'Clean your room up!' .
3. One day HE IS going to come in here and IT would be like 'Clean your room up!' . ??

If my observation is correct, the meaning of the above sentences would become clear if you add the following sentence to the begining of each of the above sentences,"He keeps screaming/giving orders all the time."
Hi Jack,

This is a form of colloquial English which I believe began amongst young people in the US and is now pretty widespread in Eng. speaking countries.

they all essentially mean:

"One day he's going to come in here and tell me to clean up my room."

The speaker feels he is gaining emphasis. By using "he is going to be like ... " he is trying to bring the listener into the imaginary situation.

The word like when used in this manner is often accompanied by a body movement such as a slight shrug of the shoulder or hand gesture, or a facial gesture.
'Clean your room up!'


Here the speaker is using the actual words that he assumes his (father) will say to him
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What difference does it make when I use 'is' or 'will' or 'would'? Does it matter?
1. One day he is going to come in here and he is going to be like 'Clean your room up!'.
2. One day he is going to come in here and he will be like 'Clean your room up!' .
3. One day he is going to come in here and he would be like 'Clean your room up!' .

Scenario (#4,5,6) : Let's say there are two lanes.

4. What position would you stay in?
5. What position will you stay in?
6. What position do you stay in?
For #4, 5, and 6, what do they mean? It seems like I can use any one of them for speaking?

Thanks.
"is" ... present tense

"will" ... future aspect

"would" ... conditional.

Don't take your example sentences as models for English usage - they are really a form of slang, which has its own different rules.
I don't get the usage of 'wouldn't, doesn't, and won't ' here. Could you explain the meaning to me for these sentences?

1. I don't see why it wouldn't work with this tool.
2. I don't see why it doesn't work with this tool.

3. I don't see why it won't work with this tool.

Thanks.
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Hello Jack

1. Use this when you're standing round discussing the tools in a general way.

'If you were to use this tool, it wouldn't work; but if you used this one, it would.'
'But I don't see why it wouldn't work with this tool.'
'Well, look at the size of the blade. How could it possibly work with this tool?'
'But...'
etc

2. Use this when you're staring at the tool in bewilderment.

'What's up?'
'Well, I'm trying to do XYZ, but it doesn't work.'
'Have you tried that tool over there?'
'Well, no. But why doesn't it work with this tool here?'
'With that tool? Are you kidding?...'
etc.

3. Use this one when you're about to use a certain tool, and your colleague stops you.

'Hey! What are you doing, Jack?'
'Well, I'm just about to do XYZ.'
'XYZ? With that tool? Are you kidding? That won't work! You want this tool!'
[Huffily] 'Well, I don't see why it won't work with this tool...'

You can also use #3 in situation #2, since if something doesn't work at 12 o'clock, it won't work at 1 o'clock either:

'Have you tried that tool over there?'
'Well, no. But anyway, why won't it work with this tool here?'

MrP
Okay, I understand your post above. It's very clear.Emotion: smile

But what about these ones? I can't tell if 'would' is a modal or a conditional? How do you know? And what do these mean?
1. Your best bet would be to take it to a car shop and get it inspected.
2. Your best bet is to take it to a car shop and get it inspected.

3. Your best bet will be to take it to a car shop and get it inspected.

Thanks.
Hello Jack

The natural form for the 'best bet' idiom is #2. It's quite a forceful phrase: the speaker tends to assume the air of someone whose opinion matters.

As for #1: since 'best bet' already implies a degree of uncertainty, 'would' is perhaps redundant. Nonetheless, you do hear it. It turns the forceful #2 into a more tentative suggestion.

#3 is quite unusual; it sounds to me slightly more forceful than #2. 'Will' here acts as an emphasiser.

MrP
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