1 2 3  5 6 7 » 20
<...muslim woman may well claim that it is their right to wear a full veil if they want to, and I don't disagree with that, but if excercising their right to wear a full veil encroaches on my rights - or if I need to go out of my way to accommodate it, then that is clearly unfair...>

I don't think we have any right to ask people to take off their clothes...

MrP
MrPedantic
<...muslim woman may well claim that it is their right to wear a full veil if they want to, and I don't disagree with that, but if excercising their right to wear a full veil encroaches on my rights - or if I need to go out of my way to accommodate it, then that is clearly unfair...>

I don't think we have any right to ask people to take off their clothes...

MrP

MrP, we most certainly do have that right. Not insofar as to make someone strip naked - the police and customs/excise have that authority, but not individuals. Asking someone to remove a veil is not asking them to strip naked. If the person feels that they are being asked to strip naked because they have been asked to remove a veil, then that person should reconsider why they have come to live in a country where people will expect that of them. The idea of going to live in another country should be because you like that way of life, and want to be part of that. It is not to transfer the current way of life to the host country then get upset about the elements that you may not like. One cannot cherry pick, but must take the good with the bad - or in other words, accepts the elements that they may not particularly like. It is up to individuals to fit in with the country they have chosen to live in - not for the chosen country to fit in with them - if it were the case that the country should fit in with them, then there should have been no reason for them to leave their county of origin in the first place if all they want to do is turn it into wherever they came from.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
It seems to me that saying "please remove your veil" to a veiled Muslim woman is equivalent to saying "please unbutton your blouse" to an unveiled Muslim woman.

And doesn't the "current way of life" in the UK involve the notion of "tolerance" – in this case, acceptance that other people dress differently from ourselves?

MrP
But, in the UK, "please remove your veil" does not mean "please unbutton your blouse". It might mean that in the muslim country that the woman has come from, but it doesn't mean that in the UK. And, as I've already said, it is up to the people who choose to come and live in the UK, to adapt to the way of life in the UK. If anybody who comes here to live, feels that they are unable to adapt to the way of life in the UK, then perhaps they have chosen the wrong country and should think about living somewhere else. I've lived here all my life, and I love the way of life in the UK, and it's wrong for others to come here and bring with them the way of life they've supposedly come here to leave behind. It's wrong. Anybody who goes to settle in any other country, should be doing it because they like that country and it's way of life and are wanting to be part of that.
I'm rather glad I don't have Islam protecting my 'modesty'.

This 16 year old girl was hung for 'crimes against chastity'.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/5217424.stm
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.


And, as I've already said, it is up to the people who choose to come and live in the UK, to adapt to the way of life in the UK.

Hello Tidus

I see it, myself, as an option that's open to all of us.

For instance, would you feel the same way if a native British person chose to convert to Islam and adopt the veil?

All the best,

MrP
Hi there,

I've just come across the topic and as usual I should say something when it concerns my deepest belief.

I and (I believe most Muslim women in my society) wear the Hijab with pride and diginty out of our belief in Islam and the goodness of its commands, not because it's an obligatory rule imposed by the government or tradition or whatsoever. So please members don't just post what you think that people wearing the veil feel towards it. The other thing is that every one has their own perspectives but they shouldn't give absolute judgements. Again media interfers to tell the society what they should think.

Anyhow, I am not here to convince you of the importance of veil. But I should defend my right of wearing the veil. I don't have to change my principle simply because one says no. I wear Hijab believing that it's a command from God and just because I go to other countries preventing wearing it I have to take it off and forget or pretend to forget that when taking it off I am taking off my own belief in the command of God. So the matter is not merely that of appearance but that of principle. And God is definitely everywhere.

To Mr.Tidus, I don't know why you keep saying that anyone who goes to another country is because they like the way of life or want to be a part of it.When I was young, I'd lived in England for two years. And we went there because my father was studying. So one might go for studying others for medication or tourism and so on. During that period we spent really a good time. There was a mutual respect. But at that time, people used to look at the core ,what lies inside the veil, not a mere appearance.

Regards,
Mythical LadyTo Mr.Tidus, I don't know why you keep saying that anyone who goes to another country is because they like the way of life or want to be a part of it.When I was young, I'd lived in England for two years. And we went there because my father was studying. So one might go for studying others for medication or tourism and so on. During that period we spent really a good time. There was a mutual respect. But at that time, people used to look at the core ,what lies inside the veil, not a mere appearance.

Regards,

The people I had in mind are those who come here from other countries and instead of integrating into the way of life here, continue as if they were still in the country they have just left. Can you, or anybody else, explain to me why people do that? What attracts them here if they do not want to be part of the culture, or even learn the language - there was a case highlighted yesterday of a woman who has lived here for 22 years - and doesn't speak a word of English. From what I can see, many people come here and cherry pick the bits that they like whilst expecting to carry on with the way of life of the county they've left behind.

Back on the subject of the veil. It is not the Hijab that is the issue. This type of headdress is absolutely fine at all times:



However, this type is not fine in certain situations:



If anyone wants to wear the niquab or bruka in the UK then that it entirely up to them. However, they should respect that in certain situations it is not practical. In the UK, we do not do business with people we cannot see, and it is disrespectful of Niquab and Burka wearers to expect otherwise.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
MrPedantic


And, as I've already said, it is up to the people who choose to come and live in the UK, to adapt to the way of life in the UK.

Hello Tidus

I see it, myself, as an option that's open to all of us.

For instance, would you feel the same way if a native British person chose to convert to Islam and adopt the veil?

All the best,

MrP

Hi MrP, to be perfectly honest, it's none of my business who wants to convert to whatever religion. Nor is it any of my business whether or not someone chooses to wear a veil. It only becomes an issue when that person's choice encroaches on other people. If I went to live in a middle eastern country, I would not expect anyone to take off their veil just because it's not how we do things in the UK - to expect that would be disrespectful to my host country.

As I said in an earlier post, if someone came to a meeting with me wearing sunglasses, I would ask them to take them off for the duration of the meeting. I also expect anyone wearing a veil to take it down for the duration of the meeting. It matters not what colour or creed the person is. In the UK, we like to see the person we are doing business with.

With many different cultures all living in the same country there needs to be some kind of uniformity for general interaction with each other and Niqab and Burqa don't figure in that. People can wear them in their own time if they want, but should apply common sense to situations where it is not practical.

If we go along with what people are saying on here and allow people to come to business meetings etc in Niqab and Burqa, does this also therefore mean that naturists have the right to come to business meetings wearing nothing at all?
Show more