1  3 4 5 6 7 » 28
In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is ... doesn't know where Washington DC (or California) is placed ...

Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

Only few. But lots of people will recognize it as one of the U.S. states in the central north of the country - and a state with lots of descendants of Scandinavian immigrants.
BTW, there is a difference between a country with a history of more than a millenium - and what in reality is an American province with a very short history.

Per Erik Rønne
There is ignorance everywhere. I would roll my eyes at ... of the US. But I don't recall having met one.

In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is Sweden's capital ;-(.

Quite so. It's a sad observation indeed that the Danes have very little understanding of what the Americans think. Let's not be harsh on the Danes, though. With Christmas coming, we don't want to upset those North Pole people.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

This is a granfalloon (Kurt Vonnegut) viz. a presumption of shared interest that on analysis can be shown bogus or ... share an interest in knowing about other communities of size N that is undifferentiated (does not vary with proximity etc.)

Au contraire, Mr Phillipson! (A good word to know, though. Thanks.)

My presumption is that such an interest does vary with proximity and that this differentiation is entirely reasonable. That was my point.

What's more, my point wasn't about the amount that members of communities of size N know about other communities of size N, but about the amount that members of communities of an unspecified size know about communities other than their own that are of size N. Hence ...
I vote in a community of 10 million and I know the name of the head of its government: this does not imply I have an equal interest in knowing the names of the heads of government of all other communities of size 10 million.

... is not really relevant to Danish ignorance (or otherwise) of Wisconsin. Denmark - where Per lives - is neither Norway nor Wisconsin.

Perhaps you were lead astray by the coincidence that Denmark is more or less of size N. (More: it's 1.***.)

Mickwick
Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

Only few. But lots of people will recognize it as one of the U.S. states in the central north of the country - and a state with lots of descendants of Scandinavian immigrants.

Exactly! This shared heritage means that there should be a greater likelihood of Scandinavians knowing the capital of Wisconsin than of non-Scandinavian Americans (Nonscandinavian-Americans?) knowing the capital of Norway. Unless proximity does make a difference, that is. Or unless your next paragraph is true (and it might be).
BTW, there is a difference between a country with a history of more than a millenium - and what in reality is an American province with a very short history.

What is that difference? You see, I think I agree with you (unless it has something to do with burkas) but I don't know why. Why do we know and care more about small nation-states than about large provinces? Are all men not equal?
(Incidentally, I'm sure we would know more about Wisconsin's ancient history if all those Germans and Norwegians hadn't stolen it.)

Mickwick
Thus spake Charles Riggs:

It is a faraway place about which we know little. ... Not all by a long shot, you can be sure.

Is this "joking aside"?

Come on, we all know New York is the capital of America.
Steve Hayes
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is ... doesn't know where Washington DC (or California) is placed ...

Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

So perhaps Americans are more likely to know which city the European parliament is located in?
Philip Eden
Thus spake Charles Riggs: Is this "joking aside"?

Come on, we all know New York is the capital of America.

In a weird response to America's accidental nuking of Moscow in the movie "Fail Safe", the US president nukes New York City. Me, if I had to give up some town because we did that, I would've dropped the bomb on a small town in Idaho.

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata." +-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
There is ignorance everywhere. I would roll my eyes at ... of the US. But I don't recall having met one.

In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is Sweden's capital ;-(. And I've never met a Dane in middle school or above who doesn't know where Washington DC (or California) is placed ...

What is more important to the world, Washington DC or Denmark?

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata." +-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

Only few. But lots of people will recognize it as one of the U.S. states in the central north of the country - and a state with lots of descendants of Scandinavian immigrants.

A lot of Americans recognize Norway, Sweden, and Denmark as countries in the North of Europe where a lot of Scandinavian immigrants to the US came from.

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata." +-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
Show more