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In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is Sweden's capital ;-(.

Copenhagen needs to come up with a memorable, exportable cheese. Every American knows that the capital of Sweeden is Ikea, and the largest city is Volvograd. Norway's best chance at recognition is to harbor some al-Qaeda.

Volvograd? Are there any cities in Denmark using 'grad'? Over here in Washington state, we have a 'Thorp'.

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata." +-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
Copenhagen needs to come up with a memorable, exportable cheese. ... Norway's best chance at recognition is to harbor some al-Qaeda.

Volvograd? Are there any cities in Denmark using 'grad'? Over here in Washington state, we have a 'Thorp'.

But that's not a quaint and romantic survival of its name in Old English, is it? Surely the dorf is named after somebody named Thorpe.

Gary
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Thus spake Simon R. Hughes:
(Mailed to the International Herald Tribune and posted to alt.usage.english.)

Automated reply from the International Herald Tribune


Subject: Re: Isn't that the capital of Sweden?
To: "Simon R. Hughes"

Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 01:42:45 +0100
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Hmmm. Must resubmit. It's a shame they won't be answering to group.

Simon R. Hughes
I fear that the Norwegian stories of conversations with Americans who think that Oslo is the capital of Sweden will increase as a result.

It is a faraway place about which we know little. Joking aside, how many of your half-frozen Norwegian friends know ... DC? Many here don't even know the name of the capital of the US, let alone where it is located.

I suppose I ought to be surprised at that, but surveys show that many kids in many countries don't even know the capital of their own country. Some aren't even sure about the difference between a city and country.

Still, I'd have thought most semi-literate people who had heard of America, would have heard of California. They almost certainly would not know the capital of California and probably would be confused between Washington State and Washington DC, but...
Hmm, I suddenly realised it's an age thing: I was brought up on stories about gold rushes and wagon trains, so of course California stuck in my mind at an early age, but I doubt whether younger people would be familiar with things like that.

Rob Bannister
Thus spake Charles Riggs: Is this "joking aside"?

Come on, we all know New York is the capital of America.

From frequent comments here, I was beginning to believe it might be Laurel (a place I can see only with difficulty in my atlas).

Rob Bannister
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is ... doesn't know where Washington DC (or California) is placed ...

Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

I wonder how many Americans can or would even want to.

Rob Bannister
Yeah, but how many Danes can name the capital of Wisconsin, a state whose population and economy are similar in size to Norway's?

I wonder how many Americans can or would even want to.

It's not something that comes up in casual conversation very often, to be sure. Probably not even as often as Norway. However, most school children are exposed to lists of the states and their capitals, and they may even have to memorize them at some point, though that would be in the very early grades. The nations of the world don't get even that treatment, though (or at least most do not), so it's likely that a schoolchild wouldn't have reason to learn the capital of Norway (or Sweden or Denmark) unless they were particularly interested in European geography.

rzed
Volvograd? Are there any cities in Denmark using 'grad'? Over here in Washington state, we have a 'Thorp'.

But that's not a quaint and romantic survival of its name in Old English, is it? Surely the dorf is named after somebody named Thorpe.

Thorp, Washington is right next to Ellensburg, Washington. We also have a Medina, Washington. So you can see why I'm wondering about the use of 'grad' outside Slavic language speaking countries. Especially these words used alone as the names of towns, cities, etc. is interesting. The official name of Medina, Saudi Arabia is fairly long and ends with Medina, city in Arabic. This is a lot like how someone in New York City might call it "The City".
For more, although not relevant, fun, we have a town called George, Washington.

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata." +-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
>
I was going to write similar, that people in Denmark would not know the capital of a US state even one it with many more people than a Scandinavian country, but then I remembered we that we live in extraordinary times, and that California's capital has been featured in world wide news to an extent not seen for thirteen thousand days.
Anyways, that reminds me. Back around fourth grade, they used to test our knowledge of the capitals of states and countries. So now I am getting around to wondering why. I understand that it is easy to grade. But why does it matter, except to politicians?
I can see some value in having a child know one city in each large political entity, even if that city is not culturally significant. Is that it?
Maybe the whole thing was a tricky way of getting kids to remember where countries and states are located. But that could be done without having to remember
all of those cities.
For all the class time expended, I had the feeling that there would be more of a payoff. Did I get some great benefit without realizing it?
And why do they not use the most significant city?

Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
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