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In Denmark, it is said that Americans think Copenhagen is Sweden's capital ;-(.

It all comes around. In the Netherlands the joke is that USAians think Holland is the capital of Copenhagen. Of course these are vicious lies. There's nothing wron with US geographical knowledge: [/nq]
I quite agree, and so do the gnomes of Prague.
Of course there is quite a bit wrong with US geographical knowledge. Geography is not generally taught as a subject in public schools, and geographical information is relegated to casual mention during the study of history. History itself is far less emphasized than it once was, and, if my daughter's schools are any guide, the scope of the classes is less wide-ranging. She's had years of exposure to the American Civil War, but essentially none to African history (other than that of ancient Egypt), and until her 9th-grade year, essentially none to Asian history at all.

rzed
Of course these are vicious lies. There's nothing wron with US geographical knowledge: [/nq]
Someone ought to have Czeched that before transmission.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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Of course there is quite a bit wrong with US geographical knowledge. Geography is not generally taught as a subject ... African history (other than that of ancient Egypt), and until her 9th-grade year, essentially none to Asian history at all.[/nq]Have things really changed? When I were in secondary school, let's see, in eighth grade we had one term on Russian history (from pre-Kievan stuff to the "Present" (i.e., the Yalta Conference), and another term that covered Chinese history. In that second term we might have done a bit on other colonial stuff (and some of this might have been based on the preferences of the teacher), but I don't think we covered Africa at all. Not even a mention of Steve Hayes.

In ninth grade we covered European history from the late Middle Ages to the "Present" (i.e., to the Yalta Conference (well, okay, the Suez Crisis may have been mentioned too). In tenth grade we had a term of an elective social science, and then a term of American history (from the arrival of the Europeans to about 1789 or so), and in eleventh grade we had a whole year of American history (1790 or so to the "Present" (i.e., the Yalta Conference)). This was more or less in line with the official New York State Regents syllabus, except, I think, for the elective social science thing (I took psychology, which isn't really a social science, BTAWNS).
In seventh grade we did a mish-mosh of stuff in social studies, including some anthropology, some ancient history (i.e., ancient Greece), and we were supposed to get to economics but we never did.
BTW, there is a difference between a country with a ... reality is an American province with a very short history.

What is that difference? You see, I think I agree with you (unless it has something to do with burkas) but I don't know why. Why do we know and care more about small nation-states than about large provinces?

Not only "small nation-sates", but "small nation-states with a millenium long history".
BTW, what do you know about Liechtenstein? And how much do you know of a Texas county with a total population of 20,000 and three villages?
Per Erik Rønne
Grieg

The author or the composer?

Per Erik Rønne
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A lot of Americans recognize Norway, Sweden, and Denmark as ... a lot of Scandinavian immigrants to the US came from.

Those Scandiwegians are all the same.

An American couple that i met in Copenhagen told me that "Scandinavia is a lovely country" :-).

Per Erik Rønne
BTW, there is a difference between a country with a ... reality is an American province with a very short history.

What country is it you are referring to that predates 1776, let alone one that has existed for 1000 years? Surely not yours.

Probably, Denmark was founded around the third century (Funen, Zealand, Scania). The earliest written records about the Danes come from the 500s, one from Gaul and two from Constantinople. It seems as if the two sources from Constantinople have a common now lost book by Cassiodorus, written in the 400s at the Imperial capital of Ravenna. The source from Gaul, from Saint Gregory of Tours' Annals, contains the earliest date in Danish history: AD 515. A year in which the Frankish Empire was in Civil War after the death of Clovis. The Danish "King" was killed during an attack on the Frankish Empire - it is not known if he was indeed the Danish King or just a chieftain in an early viking raid.

Nothing suggests that Sweden isn't as old as is Denmark.
As a people, mericans are no less younger than yours either.

Actually, as a "people" the Americans is a very young people. And most countries in Western Europe existed before 1776.
Thirdly, my xenophobic friend,

Xenophobic?
you might want to look up the word "province".

I do very well know the meaning of the word "province". Besides history, what is the difference between a U.S. "state", a German "Land" - and a Canadian "province"?

Per Erik Rønne
So perhaps Americans are more likely to know which city the European parliament is located in?

Actually, due to France it is placed in three cities:

Brussels. Straßburg (Elsaß / Alsace). And Luxembourg.
Per Erik Rønne
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My mother is half Irish. There's so much different blood in my veins that being prejudiced against any nationality would mean my hating myself.

Any American ancestors?
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