In my opinion the following paragraph has some misuse of singular form in that it comes as

"These bonds that you build with the people you see and live with every day are what makes a community, what turns a place from an address to home."

Isn't the word "makes" right there obviously erroneaus?

Because, in my opinion, the subject is a pluralized term(these bonds), how come it's attached to a singular noun that's supposed to stand for it?

Thanks for answering in advance.
1 2
Strictly speaking you are correct. However, I read the sentence in question without noticing anything wrong until I read your question. So I guess the bottom line is that it's acceptable to a native speaker even if it is technically incorrect.
chivalryThese bonds . . . . are what makes a community . . . .
***It seems to me that "what" is singular, regardless of the antecedent.***Edit. This statement is clearly incorrect! Within the clause "what makes a community," the singular verb is correct.

Edit. Maybe I'm completely wrong.

I'm sure we'd ask, "What are the rules?"

Hmm, maybe this doesn't apply. The subject here is "rules." The rules are what. ("Are" agrees with "rules.")

Anyway, good question! - A.

How about, "The rules are what it is all about."

Must we say, "The rules are what they are all about" ?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Dear Chivalry

You are right. As the sentence is written, it should have been..

- These bonds .. make a community ..

The author could have said or written something like: "The bonds that we build with other people: that is what makes a community". And then the "makes" would have been OK

Dave
AvangiI'm sure we'd ask, "What are the rules?"
Yes, and the subject is plural - rules.

Compare with:

What is the matter?

What's the beef?

I think the original text is OK if referent is being treated as a singular collection. - The combination of all the bonds together makes a community.

On second thought, the plural is probably better.
Thanks, A/S. I made a mess of this.

So you could say "We are what makes this community," or "We are what make this community,"

depending on what you mean?

The more I say it the less certain I am! Emotion: headbang What makes this community great? We does! (Just kidding!)

A.
Try out our live chat room.
This one is deceptive... indeed, I had second thoughts about it!
dave_anonit should have been..
- These bonds .. make a community ..
Hi, Dave.
Do you mean Chivalry should have eliminated the relative clause, or do you mean the sentence should correctly be,

"These bonds that you build with the people you see and live with every day are what make a community . . . . "?

I agree that your replacement choice makes the singular more palatable.

"The bonds that we build with other people: that is what makes a community".

But you haven't really escaped the plural, have you? (I think you've only slightly insulated it.)

Shouldn't we say, "The bonds that we build with other people: Those are what make a community." ?

I agree, "that" can refer to a whole idea, but there's no finite verb.

We build bonds: that is what makes a community. This I could not argue with.

Best regards, - A.
Hi

I was just agreeing with Chivalry. One reason I decided that was by taking everything out of the sentence except the relevant bits. (It was just my idiomatic way of thinking about the problem)..

- These bonds .. makes a community

- These bonds .. make a community

The first sounds definitely wrong; the second one, I'm sure, is right.

Once that is decided, everything can be put back in..

- These bonds that you build with the people you see and live with every day are what make a community

The point that you and Alphecca seemed to be raising is interesting - does the "what" remove the need for a plural verb..

- The books are what makes this library

- The books are what make this library

I'm open to argument, but I'd still go with the second because the first implies: the books makes this library

Best regards - do get back to me - Dave
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more