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Hello, I posted this under another thread yesterday, but nobody replied.. So, I am now posting it as a new thread;

Is it okay to say "is not it?" because I don't remember I have seen it in that way, and I wonder if it's correct.. I sometimes want to use that but because I get doubtful I use 'is it not' in my papers.. So, If I want to write it in a short/informal way "isn't it?", but If I want to write it in a formal/long way I will write "is it not?" but I cannot write "is not it?" or can I? Emotion: stick out tongue

Thanks in advance Emotion: smile
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Hi Neversaynever,
sorry, I didn't reply in the other thread. I think the extended version of "isn't it" is "is it not", and not "is not it", but you'd better wait for some native speaker. However, I would never use "is it not" instead of "isn't it", even if I had to write something formal. I just don't like the extended version, you know... Emotion: smile
Hi NSN

Is not it? is always wrong. Is it not? is right. Not always comes after the subject if it isn't contracted:
are you not?
does he not?
will she not?
should they not?
etc.

Cheers
CB
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Thank you, I got it know Emotion: smile
NeversayneverIs it okay to say "is not it?" because I don't remember I have seen it in that way, and I wonder if it's correct.. use that but because I, but if I want to write it in a formal/long way I will write "is it not?" but I cannot write "is not it?" or can I? Emotion: stick out tongue
"is not it" is incorrect.
See Isn't she pretty? for a similar discussion.

CJ
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I have the same question, and would like to know if there's a bright-line rule that can be used in this situation. I appreciate your rule, but what about when it isn't a question, such as "I do not..." "You will not" etc.

The not doesn't come after the subject in these instances.
The word NOT is an adverb. We know that adverbs can move in any places in the sentence. So, you can use any of the three without violating the rules in grammar.
AnonymousWe know that adverbs can move in to any places place in the sentence.
This is false.

Adverbs can easily move to any place in the sentence is grammatical.
Adverbs can move to any easily place in the sentence is not grammatical.

CJ
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