Hi,

Most of the older people I've interviewed say that they feel no different from when they were younger. Their core identity has not changed. Some elders say that they are both "old" and "young" and that this helps them think more creatively and with less concern for conformity. Because there is less of it left, they feel more excited about the life when they are gratetful to awaken to everyday.

I have a few questions about the underlined sentence.

1. Does 'it' in the 'because' clause refer to something mentioned in the previous context?

Answer: I don't think that's true because it's normally the case that subjects in 'there' constructions are presented as information that is new to the hearer/reader: 'less of it' is not linked to something previously mentioned.

2. Then what does 'it' refer to?

Answer: I think 'it' refers to 'life', which comes later in the sentence. This type of 'it' construction is not the case in which the pronoun follows its antecednt: the order is the other way around.

ex) If she has any sense, your mother will hang on to the shares.

3. 'When' should be replaced with a relative pronoun, that or which. Why?

Answer: The reader can't infer from the previous context what life the writer is taking about. You need a relative clause to complete the meaning of 'the life'.

I'd like to know if my answers are correct. Any opinions are welcome. Thanks.
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Hi,

Most of the older people I've interviewed say that they feel no different from when they were younger. Their core identity has not changed. Some elders say that they are both "old" and "young" and that this helps them think more creatively and with less concern for conformity. Because there is less of it left, they feel more excited about the life when they are gratetful to awaken to everyday.

The use of the word 'elders' makes me think this text may not have been written by a native speaker. It woul be more natural to say eg 'older people'. In addition, it should be 'life' and not 'the life'.

As noted below, there are also problems with the 'because' clause.

I have a few questions about the underlined sentence.

1. Does 'it' in the 'because' clause refer to something mentioned in the previous context? No.

Answer: I don't think that's true because it's normally the case that subjects in 'there' constructions are presented as information that is new to the hearer/reader: 'less of it' is not linked to something previously mentioned. I agree

2. Then what does 'it' refer to?

Answer: I think 'it' refers to 'life', which comes later in the sentence. Yes This type of 'it' construction is not the case in which the pronoun follows its antecednt: the order is the other way around.

ex) If she has any sense, your mother will hang on to the shares.

3. 'When' should be replaced with a relative pronoun, that or which. Why? No. You are on the wrong track here, because the last part of that sentence is not correctly written. Instead of explaining the errors, let me just show you a correct version, and you can ask if it is not clear.

Because there is less of it left, they feel more grateful and excited about life when they awaken (wake up) every day.

Answer: The reader can't infer from the previous context what life the writer is taking about. You need a relative clause to complete the meaning of 'the life'. No. The writer is talking about life in general.

Clive

edited later -

PS A-Stars's interpretation is also possible, and indeed probably the writer's intention. I focused on keeping 'when'.

Clive
Most of the older people I've interviewed say that they feel no different from when they were younger. Their core identity has not changed. Some elders say that they are both "old" and "young" and that this helps them think more creatively and with less concern for conformity. Because there is less of it left, they feel more excited about the life when they are gratetful to awaken to everyday.

I have a few questions about the underlined sentence.

1. Does 'it' in the 'because' clause refer to something mentioned in the previous context?

Answer: I don't think that's true because it's normally the case that subjects in 'there' constructions are presented as information that is new to the hearer/reader: 'less of it' is not linked to something previously mentioned. Yes, I agree with your answer.

2. Then what does 'it' refer to?

Answer: I think 'it' refers to 'life', which comes later in the sentence. This type of 'it' construction is not the case in which the pronoun follows its antecedent: the order is the other way around. I agree with your answer.

ex) If she has any sense, your mother will hang on to the shares.

3. 'When' should be replaced with a relative pronoun, that or which. Why?

Answer: The reader can't infer from the previous context what life the writer is taking about. You need a relative clause to complete the meaning of 'the life'. No. The reason is to have the correct grammatical structure. You need a pronoun to refer to "life" and be the object of the phrasal verb "awaken to." .... they awaken to (that) life

I'd like to know if my answers are correct. Any opinions are welcome. Thanks.
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Thank you both Clive and Astars for answering my questions. I really apprecitate it.

I have two questions for Astars. Could you answer them?

The reader can't infer from the previous context what life the writer is taking about. You need a relative clause to complete the meaning of 'the life'. No. The reason is to have the correct grammatical structure. You need a pronoun to refer to "life" and be the object of the phrasal verb "awaken to." .... they awaken to (that) life

1. Could you explain your answer in a little more detail?

2. So you basically agree that there is no error in the underlined sentence except for the 'when' part, right? How does this version differ from the correct version Clive suggested in terms of meaning?

Thank you in advance for your help.
Hi,

It's a minor error, but everyday should be writtten as 'every day' in that sentence. 'Everyday' is an adjective. One more detail that makes me think perhaps this was written by a non-native speaker.

You didn't tell us.Emotion: thinking

Clive
I'm sorry about that mistake. It should be 'every day' instead of 'everyday'.

Sorry for making you confused, but I honestly don't know if the texst was written by a non-native or not. I would have told you if I had known it. Anyway, it's my bad. I hope you're not angry.Emotion: smile
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Hi,

No reason I'd be angry!Emotion: stick out tongue

Clive
I have another question.

What does it mean by "grateful to awaken to life"? I've been mulling it over all day, but I'm still not sure I understand what it really means.

Does it mean somethig like this? They are grateful for the fact that they find themselves alive when they wake up.
Hi,

Yes.

Clive
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