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M: Sorry I’m late. I tried to call, but my cell phone battery was dead.
W: What happened? You’re usually so punctual.
M: The traffic was impossible. There was no way I could’ve avoided it.
W: __
(a) It’s always possible this time of day.
(b) You’re early for our meeting.
(c) I happened to be in the neighborhood.
(d) Let me fill you in on what you missed.

answer: (d)

I posted the same question before but I'm still having a hard time undestanding why (a) could not be a possible answer.. can't I interprete the sentence (a) like " the fact that you can't avoid the heavy traffic is always possible this time of day"??? In what situation, would you use a sentence like (a)??
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M: Sorry I’m late. I tried to call, but my cell phone battery was dead.
W: What happened? You’re usually so punctual.
M: The traffic was impossible. There was no way I could’ve avoided it.
W: ____________________
(a) It’s always possible this time of day.
(b) You’re early for our meeting.
(c) I happened to be in the neighborhood.
(d) Let me fill you in on what you missed.

the answer is (d)....but (a) sounds OK to me.. I interpreted the sentence (a) like this way.. " the traffic jam is always bad this time of the day. so being late this time of the day is always possible"

can anyone explain why (a) could not be a possible answer?
thank you.
(a) is argumentative, saying the opposite of what M has just said. It's a choice that could be seen as correct, but I think logic tells us that (d) is the desired answer.
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Yes, it doesn't say "being late is possible" it's saying "it's possible to get here even with the traffic."
Hi, Bn77,

It's unclear what you intend as the antecedent of "it's." "It's always possible this time of day for the traffic to be impossible"? OR "It's always possible this time of day to avoid impossible traffic."?

The implications are opposite. In the first case you may be receiving sympathy - "Yeah, I know what you mean. It can really be bad at this time of day!"

In the second case you may be getting chewed out. "That's no excuse. There's always a way to get around bad traffic!"

Neither interpretation makes a whole heckovalotov sense, and since they're opposite, you'd have to say the whole thing is ambiguous. You shouldn't choose an ambiguous or confusing answer when a clear answer which fits is available. These questions are written by humans, after all.

I've often seen exercises where the instructions specify, "Select the best answer." The writer deliberately includes other answers which may be possible, because he wants to test your "good judgement."

Best wishes, - A.

Edit. Ah yes, GG's third possibility - "You're a liar!"
I'm going to merge your threads.

Please don't start a new thread with an existing question. People will see the first part and say "Oh, that's old." and ignore it.

You would use A if you wanted to argue.

M: I'm sorry I was late. It was impossible to get here any sooner.

W: What a lie! It's always possible this time of day. There's hardly any traffic. You just got busy and forgot about our meeting, didn't you?!
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Avangi:
To your question, in order to limit a Google


search to the New York Times or the BBC sites, parameterize the search, thus search for:
site:nytimes.com "and this is what want"
or
site:bbc.co.uk "and this is what want"

(use quotation marks)
Hi,

It always seems to me that the person who writes these 'choose the answer' questions should make all but one of the choices not grammatically possible.
But they don't do that.

Clive
Marius Hancusite:nytimes.com "and this is what want"
or

site:bbc.co.uk "and this is what want" Many thanks, Marius!
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