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I have three uncountables with possessives or "look-to-be" quantifiers. Should they all be referred with the pronoun "it"?

1) their furniture

2) some flexibility

(I got this phrase from the sentence, "I think there is some flexibilty here.")

3) their grace

Another Q:

Which one is correct?

1) Did you bring lunch? Yes, I brought lunch.

2) Did you bring the lunch? Yes, I brought the lunch.

I think the second one is correct as it is but my confusion lies with the first one. As we use the word "lunch" in so many ways, I think it almost became trite and the word "lunch" is being allowed to enter the grammatical domain of countability and permitted to act as one with a requisite article? Not a right assumption?
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Hi guys,

I have three uncountables with possessives or "look-to-be" quantifiers. Should they all be referred with the pronoun "it"?

1) their furniture

'Furniture' is not a countable noun. Say 'Your furniture is very nice. I like it'. It's the same, for example, as talking about 'their money'.

Individually, we often speak of 'a piece of furniture' or 'an item of furniture'.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
For furniture, you refer to 'their furniture' as 'they' if there is more than 1 piece. 'It' seems acceptable though. For the other two, I suppose the pronoun is 'it'.

As for the other 2, both are correct gramatically. Depending on the context. For example:

A: I made lunch.
B: So, did you bring the lunch you made?

B will have use 'the lunch' because he is referring to the lunch A made. Both A and B would know what 'the lunch' is.

Another example;

A: I'm hungry, did you bring any lunch?
B: Yeah, I made some and brought it as well.

In this case, A does NOT use 'the lunch' because he's just talking about lunch in general. If A said 'the lunch', B wouldn't know what lunch A is talking about. This rule applies is actually the same as whether to use 'a/an' or 'the'. Because lunch in this case is not a countable object, the 'a/an' is not present.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.