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Thanks, forum gurus and advanced members!

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It beats me why they call a south wind a norther, and how a wind from the south can be so tarnation cold.

I never saw anything like it. Down here in this country, the north end of a south wind is the coldest wind I ever heard of.

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In the sentence above............

1. Does the sentence, "It beats me why they call a south wind a norther" mean (1) that he does not understand why they call a south wind a norther? Or, (2) does it mean that he thinks it natural that they call a south wind a norther?

2. "the north end of a south wind " What should this expression mean?

3. What could be the situation of "call a south wind a norther"? Why would people call a south wind a norther?

Thanks in advance....

from pructus
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Hello Pructus

1. Does the sentence, "It beats me why they call a south wind a norther" mean (1) that he does not understand why they call a south wind a norther? Or, (2) does it mean that he thinks it natural that they call a south wind a norther?

— Your first choice: it is beyond his comprehension.

2. "the north end of a south wind " What should this expression mean?

— I suppose the writer imagines the wind with a head and a tail. When the wind approaches you, it is moving from the south towards the north. Therefore its "head" is closer to the north than its "tail". So the part that blows against you is its "north end".

3. What could be the situation of "call a south wind a norther"? Why would people call a south wind a norther?

— I'm not sure. Maybe in the region under discussion the people name their winds by the direction in which the wind travels, rather than the direction in comes from!

(I think "norther" is a special term, used for a cold winter wind in Texas and Florida; my understanding has always been that it comes from the north, but maybe another member will know for sure.)

MrP
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Thanks, Mr. P....