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Does "power" mean " electricity , especially when considering its use or production " or "(ENERGY) the rate at which energy is used, or the ability to produce energy :" in the link below?

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/power


"CMOS is used because it draws so little power that the original factory-installed battery often lasts for several years. However, when it begins to fail, the computer can appear to have Alzheimer’s disease, forgetting things that it has known for years, like which hard disk to boot from."

Comments  

It's "the rate at which energy is used". People use such terms as "power", "energy" and "electricity" loosely. A CMOS device actually draws little current, and power in reference to electricity is the product of EMF (volts) and current (amps). A load does not really "draw" power, it uses or dissipates it.

anonymousIt's "the rate at which energy is used". People use such terms as "power", "energy" and "electricity" loosely. A CMOS device actually draws little current, and power in reference to electricity is the product of EMF (volts) and current (amps). A load does not really "draw" power, it uses or dissipates it.

Thanks a lot!

What do you mean by "People use such terms as "power", "energy" and "electricity" loosely"?

What is the difference between "draw power" and " use power"?

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anonymousWhat do you mean by "People use such terms as "power", "energy" and "electricity" loosely"?

They have precise definitions in science, definitions very few people know or care about, and rightly so. For instance, "power" is what we call the electricity that comes into our houses on those wires from the telephone pole, but hardly anybody could tell you in plain English what a kilowatt-hour is, the unit of energy they are paying for.

anonymousWhat is the difference between "draw power" and " use power"?

It's a matter of word usage. A load "draws" current the way we draw water from a tap. To say it "draws" power exposes one as a bit naive in things electrical, that's all. People use the terms loosely, but that isn't a mortal sin or even an error we need to worry about very much, except when you want to sound like you know what you're talking about to people who actually do.