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This is a paragraph from a little essay I was reading. My concern is the last sentence.

Dorothy, your eyes see deep down, important things. Your ears hear silent things, your world is set to music. Oh, if God left something out of you, it was only to fill it with himself.

My question:

What do(es) the red and the green it refer to respectively?

Thanks in advance!
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Comments  
  First it -- the action of "leaving something out of you"      Second it -- the "something".
Hi Maple
Eight percent of men are colour blind, to an extent. I never knew I was one of them! I see nothing red in your post, though. The first it is a typical English phenomenon that means nothing. It's just a dummy subject. The green it must logically refer to your world.
Other examples of a dummy if:
It's six o'clock.
It's too cold.
It's five kilometres to the airport.
It was Bob that broke the window.
CB
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Hi, CB

The first it is in red. I guess maybe sth wrong with your browser.

Thank you!

The last word himself means God?
Cool Breeze:      Dummy "it" you call it...      What if I rephrase that sentece: "... it was done only to fill    it with himself"?    Anton
Hi, again, CB

Since you grammar guy is around. Could I ask one more question?Emotion: smile

What do the red and the green it refer to respectively?

What does the red and the green it refer to respectively?

I need do or does there?

Thanks again in advance![A]
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Maple:        Hope you don't mind if I try to answer you last questions:      The only right choice is:    "What do the red and the green it refer to respectively?"    (and I think you don't need "respectively"...)      And, yes, himself refers to Himself.  
Ant_222
Maple:

Hope you don't mind if I try to answer you last questions:

Any comments are welcome! And thanks for joining my discussions!
Ant_222
  The only right choice is:
"What do the red and the green it refer to respectively?"
(and I think you don't need "respectively"...)

And, yes, himself refers to Himself.

I beg to differ. I need respectively in its place to fulfil its irreplaceable funciton, which excludes the possbile misapprehension if I had thought they referred to the same thing.

And what does himself refers to Himself mean? Himself = God?

Maple
MapleOh, if God left something out of you, it was only to fill it with himself.
The intended meaning is
Oh, if God left something out of you, [God's act of leaving something out of you] was only to fill [the space in you that resulted from the act of leaving something out of you] with (God) himself.
But there is something completely wrong with the second it, because, as written, it refers to the thing left out. That has God filling what he left out with God himself -- a totally illogical situation, since what he left out would still be in his possession, not within Dorothy, and the intent is to show that Dorothy is "filled with" God, not that what God left out of Dorothy is filled with God.

All in all, this sentence is not for the faint of heart! A pathological case!
CJ
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