+0
Sorry about the title for this threat, I couldn't think of a good one Emotion: sad

When the winter is coming it starts to get dark earlier and when summer is coming it starts to get dark later. My question is: is there any verb in English to say that? For example, In winter the days ...

TIA Emotion: smile
1 2
Comments  
perhaps:

---------
At 7:23 A.M. on December 21st of this year, the winter solstice will
occur, signaling the beginning of winter. The exact time changes
slightly from year to year (some years, it falls on December 22nd),
but the significance is the same. The sun has reached as far south as
it will go until the equinox on June 21st, when the days begin to grow
shorter
again. To northerners, having reached the first day of winter
is a good reason to begin celebrating the holidays.

http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF6/693.html
-----------
Also:

---------
Tonight seems to be short since sunset sets in earlier everyday
http://www.fishingbuddy.com/forums/topic.php?fid=39704&tid=19007
---------
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think what you said originally is fine. You could say "the hours of daylight lengthen" and "the hours of daylight grow shorter" (Probably you could say "the day sof daylight shorten" but that sounds so odd to me!)
Winter is coming; the days are getting shorter. Summer is coming; the days are getting longer. In winter, the days are shorter than in summer. The days get shorter and shorter until Winter Solstice, then they start getting longer again. The day of Summer Solstice is the longest day of the year.

Does this help?
Thank you very much for your answers. They've been really helpful. In fact I was thinking of a phrasal verb, I knew there was a phrasal verb to say that but I couldn't remember it.

But I've just remembered it, I think you can say: 'When the winter is coming the days draw in', meaning that the days are shorter, am I right?

Is there a similar phrasal verb to say the opposite, i.e. that the days are longer.

TIA
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
CoachpotatoBut I've just remembered it, I think you can say: 'When the winter is coming the days draw in', meaning that the days are shorter, am I right?
Yes, you can say that:
-----------
draw in:

intransitive verb
1 : to draw quickly toward an end <as day drew in and twilight deepened> : shorten in a seasonally normal manner<the evenings are drawing in and it will soon be winter>

Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged
.
--------------
two phrasal verbs:
drawing in /out
the days are drawing in = winter approaches
the days are drawing out = summer is in the air.

incho
the days are drawing in

the days are drawing out

I don't think I've ever heard anyone say either of these. I don't doubt that they're in the dictionary; I'm just saying they are not in common use, at least not in the U.S.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more