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"If this particular plan has been shut down, which it obviously has been, I hope they keep trying to change the layout of the park. "

Hello, I don't understand the grammar in the clause "which it obviously has been". I need your kind help:

  • at first, what is it the word "which" represent?
->if "which" = "this particular plan", why an "it" is added after "which"?

->so, "which" = "shut down" ?

Thank you in advance.
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Hello ESL,

Yes, that's right:

1. If the plan has been shut down, which it obviously has been, I hope...

=

2. If the plan has been shut down, [and] "shut down" it obviously has been, I hope...

Best wishes,

MrP
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Hi,

"If this particular plan has been shot down, which it obviously has been, I hope they keep trying to change the layout of the park. "

Hello, I don't understand the grammar in the clause "which it obviously has been". I need your kind help:

  • at first, what is it the word "which" represent? It refers to 'shot down'.
  • if "which" = "this particular plan", <<<< it doesn't why an "it" is added after "which"?


  • This is casual and rather substandard grammar. It is commonly used in casual speech to stress the truth (or falsehood) of some previous conditional statement. Here are a couple of examples that are simpler than yours.

    eg If Tom is rich, which he is, Mary will marry him.

    eg If Tom is rich, which he isn't, Mary will marry him.

    Best wishes, Clive