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"How is your condition now?"

"It has much improved."

"It has greatly improved."

"It has improved greatly."

"It has improved much."

May I ask if the last sentence is unacceptable? Thank you very much for your answer!
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Hi,
I think it's acceptable but uncommon.

As an answer to the question, "How is your condition now?" have you considered "improved" as an adjective? - It is much / greatly improved. I think it better answers the question, although the verb is probably more common.

- A.
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Viceidol"How is your condition now?"

"It has much improved."

"It has greatly improved."

"It has improved greatly."

"It has improved much."
It is rather exceptional and a little odd to place much between the perfect tense auxiliary (has) and the participle (improved). That rules out the first sentence; I don't see anything wrong with the rest.
CB
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Hi CB,

Would you feel the same about a transitive usage? "I have much appreciated your support through the years." - A.
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AvangiWould you feel the same about a transitive usage? "I have much appreciated your support through the years." - A.

I could live with that. I never thought of it. A longer sentence with an object seems indeed to make the position of muchless objectionable. English sure is a funny language!Emotion: smile (How did you ever learn it?)
CB
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Pure osmosis, I guess. One of my earliest recollections is of being close to the ground, surrounded by giants who were talking to each other. I was overwhelmed by a sureness I'd never know what it was about. - A.