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Hi,

I'm so confused about these...Emotion: tongue tied putit / he / she or something else in parenteses...

  1. "Kooyeen? Is ( ... ) a male?"
  2. "Kooyeen? Is ( ... ) a female?"
  3. "Kooyeen? Is ( ... ) a male or a female?"
  4. "Kooyeen? ( ... ) is a male!"
  5. "Kooyeen? ( ... ) is a female!"
  6. "Kooyeen? I don't know if ( ... ) is a male or a female."
  7. "Kooyeen? ( ... ) is not a male."


  8. I'd like to get an answer that takes account of common American English, not prescriptive grammar rules that apply (maybe) only to very formal contexts.

    Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
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KooyeenHi,

I'm so confused about these...Emotion: tongue tied putit / he / she or something else in parenteses...

  1. "Kooyeen? Is ( ... ) a male?" that
  2. "Kooyeen? Is ( ... ) a female?" that
  3. "Kooyeen? Is ( ... ) a male or a female?" that
  4. "Kooyeen? ( ... ) is a male!" he
  5. "Kooyeen? ( ... ) is a female!" she
  6. "Kooyeen? I don't know if ( ... ) is a male or a female." I would say "that person".
  7. "Kooyeen? ( ... ) is not a male." she


  8. I'd like to get an answer that takes account of common American English, not prescriptive grammar rules that apply (maybe) only to very formal contexts.

    Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
    I hope this helps.
In my opinion, it should be Kooyeen? I don't know if ( it ) is a male or a female.
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You can't refer to people as 'it's.

You could be sneaky and say Kooyeen? I don't know if it is a male or a female name. Then you are calling the name it and not the person.

Realistically, you'd say 'I don't know if Kooyeen is male or female'. 'Is Kooyeen male or female?'

She is always for females.

He is always for males.

It isn't used for people (apart from the occasional baby exception, and then NOT in front of the parents or others connected to the baby as they will be insulted).
I'd say you can refer to a person as "it", as in "Who is it?" "It's Jim."
Yes that's true. But you are not really referring to a specific person there - it's the sort of thing you say when there is a knock at the door. You have no idea if it is one person, a group of people, a man, woman, child or any variation thereof - or even a dog bashing the door with its tail!
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J LewisI'd say you can refer to a person as "it", as in "Who is it?" "It's Jim."
I agree with Lewis. Even if we know that a person is at the door, we would use "Who is it?"
You can also say "Who's that over there?" "It's my brother".
J LewisYou can also say "Who's that over there?" "It's my brother".
I agree. I think It's used in this way is similar to There is a snake over there. The first 'There' does perform the same function as the second 'there'.
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