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it's a shame/what a shame etc

spoken used when you wish a situation was different, and you feel sad or disappointed:

Shame
[uncountable] the feeling you have when you feel guilty and embarrassed because you, or someone who is close to you, have done something wrong:

Shameful
shameful behaviour or actions are so bad that someone should feel ashamed:

Ashamed
feeling embarrassed and guilty because of something you have done

It is a shame that you have to leave so soon.

It is shame that you have to leave so soon.

It is shameful that you have to leave so soon.

It is shameful that you stole it.

It is a shame that you stole it.

Some say it is shameful that...means the same as it it a shame that...but according to the definitions, a shame does not involve feeling embarrassed and guilty, so I think that the two structures have a different meaning or sometimes they are interchangeable for the same meaning? Or it should be it is shame that...but I've never seen the structure, so what do you native English speakers here think? Thank you so much in advance.
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Hans51so I think that the two structures have a different meaning
I agree. 'It's a shame' usually just means 'Too bad!' or 'It's regrettable'. It is a common expression.
'It is shameful' casts shame upon the perpetrator and is a less common expression except among the more prudish.
Comments  
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Thank you and if 'It is shameful' is less common, what do you recommend or use for the same meaning as it?
The following are okay:

It's a shame that you have to leave so soon. (You would not say "It's shameful that you have to leave so soon." "It's shame that..." is ungrammatical; the indef. article is required here. You would usually not say "I'm ashamed to leave so soon.")

It's shameful that you stole it. (You would not say "It's a shame that you stole it.)

I'm ashamed that I stole it.
Hans51 if 'It is shameful' is less common, what do you recommend or use for the same meaning as it?
I simply mean that people don't find things shameful as often as they say 'it's a shame'.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

An old post but still relevant after von der Leyens speech yesterday (24.6.21) regarding the Hungarian anti-LGBTQ+ legislation, in which she said “The Hungarian bill is a shame.” Which, as already pointed out means “it’s regrettable”, or for my ears “it’s not particularly good but that’s the way it is”. I am sure she meant that the law is shameful.


And just to comment on a previous post, you could say “It is shameful that you have to leave so soon.” But it in a context like “it’s shameful you are leaving to go to pub with your friends, it’s your daughter’s birthday.”


“It’s a shame you’re leaving so soon” on the other hand, means something like “I wish you didn’t have to leave so soon”.