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A: Airfares are really high these days. I keep thinking they can't get any worse
B: Don't say that. If you say it, it may come true?? (This doesn't sound idiomatic. What would you say instead to mean the same thing?)

Thanks.
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New2grammarA: Airfares are really high these days. I keep thinking they can't get any worse
B: Don't say that. If you say it, it may come true?? (This doesn't sound idiomatic. What would you say instead to mean the same thing?)

Thanks.

Don't say that, it might happen/come true.

A: Airfares are really high these days. I keep thinking they can't (get any worse) - I would suggest ......they can't go any higher.
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This phrase is fine to me.

However, the "it" in "it may come true" logically refers to "can't get any worse", which is actually the exact opposite of what's meant (I assume). In everyday conversation this would probably pass unnoticed because the intended meaning is obvious.
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Comments  
Thanks, Optilang and Mr. Wordy.
optilangcan't (get any worse) - I would suggest ..they can't go any higher.
By the way, what's the difference, Optilang?
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New2grammarThanks, Optilang and Mr. Wordy.
optilangcan't (get any worse) - I would suggest ..they can't go any higher.
By the way, what's the difference, Optilang?

Just my feeling - oops sorry, preference! Emotion: big smile

We have high prices, surely they can't go/get any higher.

We have bad prices, surely they can' get any worse.

But I would accept your version - mine was only a suggestion for you to consider.
Thank you, Optilang. I love suggestions. I really appreciate it.