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Is it always "It seems to me....." or is it "I seem....." also possible?

If so, when do you use the latter?

Would you please give me some examples?

Thank you

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teal limeIs it always "It seems to me....." or is it "I seem....." also possible?

Both are used, but they are not equivalents.

You can pull the subject in the subordinate clause up to the position of subject in the main clause. The original subordinate clause then becomes an infinitival construction.

It seems that the rain is stopping.
> The rain seems to be stopping.

But you can't do anything with the 'to me' / 'to us' phrase.

It seems to me that the rain is stopping.
> The rain seems to be stopping.


Subordinate in present tense> present + infinitive

It seems like things in Syria are getting worse.
Things in Syria seem to be getting worse.

In this time of political divisiveness, it seems to me we have a rare consensus.
In this time of political divisiveness, we seem to have a rare consensus.

Whenever a celebrity passes, it seems that several biographies suddenly appear.
Whenever a celebrity passes, suddenly several biographies seem to appear.


Subordinate in past tense> present + perfect infinitive

It seems to us he was in Rome in January.
He seems to have been in Rome in January.

It seems plain that several things went wrong.
Plainly several things seem to have gone wrong.

It seems like the author of this piece lost his way halfway through the article.
The author of this piece seems to have lost his way halfway through the article.

CJ

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You can use both, but in different ways.

E.g.

It seems (to me) that you have been very busy.

I seem to have lost my spectacles.

You could substitute the word 'appear(s)' in these sentences for 'seem(s)' and the meaning would be retained.

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Comments  

Dear CJ:

I'm writing back because I'm having problems understanding these (the examples are okay):

CalifJimSubordinate in present tense> present + infinitive
CalifJimSubordinate in past tense> present + perfect infinitive

Would you please explain their meaning further?

Thank you very much for your kind help.

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infinitives: to be, to go, to take, to find
perfect infinitives: to have been, to have gone, to have taken, to have found


It seems (that/like) (an impersonal construction) + present tense clause:

It seems like [ [things in Syria]subj [are]pres getting worse ]clause.
=
[Things in Syria]subj seem [to be]inf getting worse.

It seems (that/like) (an impersonal construction) + past tense clause:

It seems [ [he]subj [was]past in Rome in January ]clause.
=
[He]subj seems [to have been]perf inf in Rome in January.

CJ