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Hi,
I was a little unsure about using of each of them, especial "it" and "that". When we are speaking of something then in the very next section we are referring to that matter. And this! I doubt that if I could use "this" for referring.

I would appreciate if you could explain the rule of using these ( or those? pronouns)
e.g.
{some expression}. That/This/These/Those (I don't think I could use "it" in here) is/are what...
If you heat a bowl of water its temperature doesn't exceed 100 C in 1 atm. That is why use pressure cooker.
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Comments  
youzouI would appreciate if you could explain the rule
The correct use of the demonstratives (this, that, these, those) and the inanimate pronoun (it) depends more on imitating what speakers and writers normally do with these words than on specific rules.

It would take at least a chapter of a book just to skim the surface of all these usages, so it would be better if you limited your question to a few specific instances that are troubling you.

It's hard to know exactly what you are looking for, but you might start with this.
It vs that

CJ
Thank you for your reply. So there is no simple logical rule? Such that if the expression is continuing on the same thing use "this" and if you are making a contrast use "that".

Where have you find this (this or that ? Emotion: smile ) much patience? Emotion: smile
You are an excellent role model. (is this a right expression?)
Thanks. Emotion: smile
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youzouIf you heat a bowl of water its temperature doesn't exceed 100 C in 1 atm. That is why use pressure cooker.
Correct. When referring to stated facts,

This >
< That

In other words, if you are going to say it next, refer to it as "This"; if you already said, refer to it as "That".

Even so, people do occasionally use "This" to refer to something already said just a very short time ago, but it's not usual and it can sound affected.

-- We should have taken less luggage.
-- That's true. (Sometimes people say: This is true.)

CJ
youzouno simple logical rule?
Nothing that is strict enough to call a rule. No.
youzouWhere have you find found this (this or that ? ) much patience?
The normal adverb of degree there is 'that'. It's not a demonstrative. 'this' is not wrong, but unusual.
youzouYou are an excellent role model.
The expression is correct. 'role model' ~ someone worthy of imitating

CJ
CalifJimThis >< That
I haven't understand this signs. "This" bigger than, or more proper, what? Same as "That".
(I am an engineer, and I know math, but I haven't understand this or thatEmotion: smile )
CalifJimIn other words, if you are going to say it next, refer to it as "This"; if you already said, refer to it as "That".
" refer to it" : it or that? I preferred use "that" or "this" when I am referring to something. I think it is more precise. (if precise is a good word, I usually use it (or "this" and I don't think "that" is correct) for measurements.

I meant if I want to continue on the same matter I use "this". You said "are going to", which could be more general than continue. Right?

What do you mean from "if you already said"? You meant that I have told the story completely, and now I am using it to make a contrast or additional information?
CalifJim-- We should have taken less luggage.-- That's true. (Sometimes people say: This is true.)
I assumed that it is a conversation. Am I correct?
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CalifJimyouzouWhere have you find found this (this or that ? ) much patience?
The normal adverb of degree there is 'that'. It's not a demonstrative. 'this' is not wrong, but unusual.
I understand your explanation, but I think it is not logical (I know it could have no rule, but I think there is always a reason)..
You are talking about near things. Perhaps because you finish explaining and referring them as a sort of black box. You know what I mean?
youzouI haven't understand this signs. I didn't understand these signs.
I explained them in different words later in the post.
"This" points to what comes next. (This > X = "This" points to X. X comes later.)
"That" points to what came earlier (X < That = "That" points to X. X comes earlier.)
youzou" refer to it"
Here 'it' refers to 'whatever you are talking about'.

If you are going to say it next, refer to it as "This"; if you already said it, refer to it as "That".
=
If you are going to say whatever you are talking about, refer to whatever you are talking about as "This".
If you already said whatever you are talking about, refer to whatever you are talking about as "That".

These points are illustrated in the link I gave you.
youzouWhat do you mean from by "if you already said (it)"? You meant that I have told the story completely, and now I am using it to make a contrast or additional information?
I mistakenly left out "it". It should be "if you already said it".

My point has nothing to do with contrasts or additional information. You've told the story and you want to refer back to the story as a whole, so you use "That". You gave an example earlier about boiling water and pressure cookers.
youzouI assumed that it is a conversation. Am I correct?
Yes. I indicate conversations like that in my posts.

CJ
Thanks.
Now, I see what are you talking about. You know, I meant "this" and "that" for what have already come before. I was confused that if there were (am I using "were" correctly? I am expressing unreal "if" - but not for question) any situation that we would use "this" or "it" when we are referring to the very past things ( events or sayings or explanations or ...). That is why I was saying about making contrast and... Is there any situation that fit those (could I use "the" instead of those?) conditions?

Thanks again.
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