OK, it took 20 years, but today I had a revelation. The fact that it took 20 yrs is deeply embarring, though . . .
Two decades ago I had a job at the local country club. There is a brand of golf equipment called "Titleist". Naturally (or not), I pronounced the name "TIT-lice-st". My manager corrected my pronunciation, saying it was "TIGHT-list". For twenty years I have thought this was some strange American aversion to saying the word "tit". It was only today that I realised that (duh!) it was "Title-ist". Oops! How embarrasing.
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OK, it took 20 years, but today I had a revelation. The fact that it took 20 yrs is deeply ... to saying the word "tit". It was only today that I realised that (duh!) it was "Title-ist". Oops! How embarrasing.

Every normal person thinks it's "tit - liced" like you did. You're not the one who should be embarrassed. Blame them for choosing such a dumbass name.

Adrian
OK, it took 20 years, but today I had a revelation. The fact that it took 20 yrs is deeply ... to saying the word "tit". It was only today that I realised that (duh!) it was "Title-ist". Oops! How embarrasing.

There was a tale (could be an urban myth) some years back of a nicotine substitute introduced to help people give up smoking. The name, Nocoff, was supposed to be pronounced 'No cough', but the product was withdrawn when consumers insisted on calling it 'knock off' (AmE 'desist').
I believe the Chrysler Nova story has already been debunked by Spanish speakers in these hallowed pages.
DC
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OK, it took 20 years, but today I had a ... I realised that (duh!) it was "Title-ist". Oops! How embarrasing.

Every normal person thinks it's "tit - liced" like you did.

Nonsense. It would never have occurred to me that it might be tit-liced. A titleist is one who wins a title; it's a standard word, and it's what I thought was meant before I read this posting.

Mike Hardy
OK, it took 20 years, but today I had a ... I realised that (duh!) it was "Title-ist". Oops! How embarrasing.

There was a tale (could be an urban myth) some years back of a nicotine substitute introduced to help people ... to be pronounced 'No cough', but the product was withdrawn when consumers insisted on calling it 'knock off' (AmE 'desist').

Wouldn't you say "knock it off" if you meant desist? "Knock off" round here means stolen.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
A friend of mine used to refer to his favorite sandwich bar as "Fatal Bert's"
It took me some time to realize he was deliberately mangling "Fat Albert's"
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John Ings filted:
A friend of mine used to refer to his favorite sandwich bar as "Fatal Bert's" It took me some time to realize he was deliberately mangling "Fat Albert's"

And then there was the famous Scottish actor who appeared on Jeopardy and insisted on reading one of the category titles as "The Rapists"..r
I believe the Chrysler Nova story has already been debunked by Spanish speakers in these hallowed pages.

How about the Esso to Exxon story?
Today, Laura F. Spira (Email Removed) gosled:
There was a tale (could be an urban myth) some ... when consumers insisted on calling it 'knock off' (AmE 'desist').

Wouldn't you say "knock it off" if you meant desist? "Knock off" round here means stolen.

To me, "knock-off" is a noun meaning some thing like "something meant to imitate another", so that an Allen Sherman song might be a knock-off of(1) the Marseillaise and Glad's sealable, reuseable, microwav(e?)able containers are a knock-off on(1) Rubbermaid's.
(1) Notice both "of" and "on". "Of" more formally. In fact, "take-off" more formally than "knock-off".
Michael Hamm
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
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