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someone has told me that I can use "it" as a noun to make a sentence where "it" has no meaning or reference other than to be the subject.

For example,

Through this excellent advertisement, it causes people to watch more tv, and moreover, to buy our products.

where "it" should have no meaning other than to make a sentence.

Is this correct?

I think "it" can be used to have no "meaning or reference" when used like this:
"It's ok to watch tv." or "It is snowing." but I'm not sure...

Help with "it" usage!
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Your "someone" has given you bad advice, but it's not atypical of sloppy writing by native English speakers. In your example, the sentence should be simply, "This excellent adverstisement causes people to watch more TV, and moreover, to buy our products." or "Because of this excellent advertisement, people will watch more TV... etc."

On the other hand, "It's snowing" is perfectly fine.
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Yes; your sentence only makes sense if "it" refers to something other than the advert. (For instance, "it" here might refer to a jingle, which is used in several different adverts, and is known to encourage people to buy the product.)

MrP
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Comments  
so, is there any sentence where "it" has no specific meaning other than to make the sentence a sentence? if so, how? or does it usually refer to something?
some examples would be great
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I found this online:

3.

a. Used as an anticipatory subject or object: Is it certain that they will win?

b. Used as an anticipatory subject to emphasize a term that is not itself a subject: It was on Friday that all the snow fell.

what is an anticipatory subject? And how to use it?
Hi,

what is an anticipatory subject?

Simply put, it means that first you read/hear 'it', and after that you find out what 'it' is. eg It was the phone that woke him up.

Best wishes, Clive