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Dear teachers ,

Please help correct my translation below::

Situation : Last month the company managenent planned to appoint John the marketing manager , but for some reason ,they changed their mind and appointed Alice marketing manager.

So can I say this to Alice ?:

1/ John was to have been appointed marketing manager , not you .

And can I say this to one of my friends ?:

2/ It was to have been John who was appointed marketing manager , not Alice ,

Please correct me

Thank you in advance
Comments  
These are both beautiful, maybe a little too much so Emotion: smile

1 is fine.

2 is also correct, but it would be more usual to hear "John was going to be appointed" than "it was to have been John who was appointed." (Or to put it in active voice, "They were going to appoint John." ) "It was to have been John who was..." is a lot of little words to keep straight, even for native speakers.

In fact, you'd probably hear, "John was going to be appointed marketing manager, not you" for number 1, too. Or maybe "They were planning to appoint John."

HTH
Thank you very much Delmobile:d
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Hi, Delmobile.

Tuongvan wrote:

So can I say this to Alice ?:

1/ John was to have been appointed marketing manager , not you .

To this, you said 'fine'. Could this be fine too?

John was to be appointed marketing manager, not you.
Okay, now I'm in over my head. Both sentences are correct, and either would work in your situation, but obviously there is a very slight difference between "was to have been" and "was to be." (If I knew more about grammar, I could label the tenses with their proper names, but I can't.)

Help!
Another alternative, but with a less clear sequence of tenses, perhaps:

2/ It was John who should have been appointed marketing manager , not Alice.

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TuongvanSo can I say this to Alice ?:

1/ John was to have been appointed marketing manager , not you .

You can say it to Alice; but Alice might be offended. It sounds very much as if John was your preferred candidate.

If you don't want to offend Alice, but don't want to be entirely untruthful, you can say e.g.

2. At one stage, there was a possibility that John would be appointed as marketing manager. But of course, after we looked at your CV, it was obvious who was the better candidate.

MrP