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Here is a structure I don't really master:

1. It's a long time since I went to the hairdresser's

2. It's been a long time since I went to the hairdresser's

3. It's a long time since I've been to the hairdresser's

4. It's been a long time since I've been to the hairdresser's

Are they all correct? If yes, how do I know which one to use? Thanks!
1 2 3
Comments  
In adverb clause since, the verb is past tense and the main clause needs present prefect tense. so only # 2 is correct.
#4 seems correct to me as well.

I used to go get my hair styled every Satuday afternoon. But then Peggy, my favorite hairstylist left, and I haven't found anyone I like as well. So it's been a long time since I've been to the hairdresser's.

And you'll find that people will use the others in casual speech.
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I thought "since" was followed by a complement/clause referring to a precise moment in the past. So how can we justify the present perfect here?
You're saying my example is incorrect? How would you rewrite it? The present perfect of habitual action seems appropriate here.
Grammar Geek#4 seems correct to me as well.

I used to go get my hair styled every Satuday afternoon. But then Peggy, my favorite hairstylist left, and I haven't found anyone I like as well. So it's been a long time since I've been to the hairdresser's.

And you'll find that people will use the others in casual speech.

I've learnt "since" is "from the moment when". So the present perfect can't be used here. I can understand the structure, but grammatically, it makes no sense...
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Hello W2, I haven't seen you for a while.

To my mind, the examples have the following nuances:

#1 states the simple fact of the length of time.

With #2, there's a suggestion that you might be about to have a haircut, or are thinking about it.

With #3, you are putting a little more emphasis on the length of time. That's what you want to express. (You might say it in a wondering tone, for instance.)

And #4 is a combination of #2 and #3.

But I may be imagining it. I'd be interested to hear what other people have to say.

MrP
Grammar Geek#4 seems correct to me as well.

I used to go get my hair styled every Satuday afternoon. But then Peggy, my favorite hairstylist left, and I haven't found anyone I like as well. So it's been a long time since I've been to the hairdresser's.

And you'll find that people will use the others in casual speech.

"So it's been a long time since I've been to the hairdresser's". I see no problem with this sentence.

It's been a long time since I had last visited DisneyWorld.

It's been a long timesince (subj + present / past perfect + object), this structure is fine to me Emotion: smile
Emotion: tongue tied Sorry!

I've just realized my examples were not very convincing, since I didn't use the same verb after since. I'll rewrite them as follows:

1. It's 4 years since I had a haircut.

2. It's 4 years since I've had a haircut.

3. It's been 4 years since I had a haircut.

4. It's been 4 years since I've had a haircut

Now, what's your take?
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