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Hi all, please help me clarify the meaning of "It's almost as if" and "It's as if". Are they both interchangeable? Thank you.
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Essentially they are used interchangeably without distinction by most people; adding almost weakens the comparison by just a bit.
How about "It's almost like.."
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AnonymousHow about "It's almost like.."
The same, in general usage. However, there are still some grammarians who insist that 'like' should be used with an adjective and 'as' with an adverb.
I saw an advertisement long time ago that says "Got milk?" Now, my question is why not "Have milk?" instead. Can you explain the difference esp in American English...Thanks
AnonymousI saw an advertisement long time ago that says "Got milk?" Now, my question is why not "Have milk?" instead.
"Got milk?" is a shorter form of "Have you got milk?", which has exactly the same meaning as "Do you have milk?"

"Got" is more commonly used in the given context, and it has a more sparkly sound to it, anyway. Besides, the advertisers don't want any confusion with another use of "have", namely, "consume". "I had milk" ~ "I drank milk". So "Have milk?" can have the meaning of "Do you drink milk?", and that's not what the advertisers want to ask. In the final analysis "got" is much better than "have" in this context.

(AmE)

CJ
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So when speaking about possession, 'got/have got' and 'have' can both be used for whoever posseses the thing or person in question. Please correct me if I'm wrong, cause I would've thought they're used differently like for non personal and personal belonging.
AnonymousI would've thought they're used differently like for non personal and personal belonging.
You may be right, but I don't quite understand your question. Can you please give examples of personal and non-personal belonging as you are using those terms here?

CJ
Maybe private or non private thing/person would be more appropriate term for that question?...For instance:

Do you have xerox in here?
(Have you) Got zerox in here?

Do you have an uncle?
(Have you) Got an uncle?

(Have you) Got a watch?
Do you have a watch?

She has any kids?
(Has) she got any kids?

Do you have a sister?
Got a sister?
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