+0
1. It's three years since I last smoked a cigarette.
2. It's been three years since I last smoked a cigarette.


Q1: Are there any differences between them? Do they mean the same thing?

Q2: What about their daily use?

Many thanks in advance.


1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
I love the British accent. But I don't know British English enough to say whether the "it is x years " pattern is or it is not commonly accept. I'll say it again. I am speaking as a Californian living in northern part of the state where many people from different nations live, including the Brits, and what we hear on the mdeia and how people use the language is what I would call main-stream. I have never heard this pattern used by the natives. That's all. By the way, would you call "it's 3 years" good English, or main-stream, if you will ? Just curious....
grammarfreak I am speaking as a Californian living in northern part of the state where many people from different nations live, including the Brits, and what we hear on the mdeia and how people use the language is what I would call main-stream.
My sincere apologies. I had not realised that the English that Californians are exposed to is 'main-stream' and that, by implication, anything that does not conform to that is "ungrammatical" or " not used for all".

Now that I know the truth I shall, before I commit Seppuku to atone for the ignorance I have spread in my lifetime of perniciously flawed teaching, inform my equally guilty colleagues in the United Kingdom, The Republic of Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the benighted forty-nine non-Californian states of the USA (and the District of Columbia) of the way, the truth and the light. Thank you, from the heart of my bottom, for enlightening me.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
No apology deserved. I am a mere serious learner sometimes saying more than I should, and thus leave my mouth wide open for my own foot, ( othe others') Emotion: big smile. Appreciated your reply...
Sincerity, Oh how foolish! I am not very good when it comes to reading between the lines and deciphering sarcasism. So I savored it slowly this time.

By no means I suggested northeren Califfornia media and the brand of English people speak are more superior. My statement merely pointed out the locality as a reference and where I am speaking from for those who are not familar. The language the journalist and news anchors speak and used in the local news casts and network news casts are what I would consider "main-stream". Just in case someone forgot, many new words and phrases are coined in the Bay Area and Silicon Valley as new technolgies are invented everyday in the northern region. If that reference is not credible enough, may be someone can enlighten me. Bottom line - It is three years is not good English in any reference book, which was the question in discussion. I don't know how to talk in riddle or speak in sarcasm. So basically anyone who doesn't like the way " main-stream" is defined, I am open to suggestions.
grammarfreak. Bottom line - It is three years is not good English in any reference book
In British English,present and past tenses are common in the structure It is/was ... since ...
It's a long time since the last meeting,

Swan, Michael (2005.522), Practical English Usage (3rd edn), Oxford: OUP.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yes they mean the same thing