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1. It's three years since I last smoked a cigarette.
2. It's been three years since I last smoked a cigarette.


Q1: Are there any differences between them? Do they mean the same thing?

Q2: What about their daily use?

Many thanks in advance.


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Ofrienfdragon1. It's three years since I last smoked a cigarette.
2. It's been three years since I last smoked a cigarette.


Q1: Are there any differences between them? Do they mean the same thing?

Q2: What about their daily use?
The usual usage is "It's been three years since I last smoked a cigarette."
No difference in meaning between the two sentences.
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Ofrienfdragon1. It's three years since I last smoked a cigarette.
2. It's been three years since I last smoked a cigarette.


Q1: Are there any differences between them? Do they mean the same thing?

Q2: What about their daily use?

Many thanks in advance.



Hi Ofrienfdragon,

The actual correct usage is "It has been xy years since..." which often is contracted as" it's been... since". It's 3 years since ....is not really main-stream usage from my persepctive. So if you can avoid it, try not to use "it's XY years since..."


1. it is three years...
2. it has been three years...
A1: ^ that is the difference.
A2: you would use number one when saying something like today, it's three years.. when you have a certain date you are refering to
number two is more of a general statemenet saying how long it has been in the past instead of saying what today is. Overall they mean pretty much the same thing.
This is absolutely correct.
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This thread is a few years old! Anyway, I don't know which anon you are but I find your answer not only misleading, it is also wrong . First of all, you should capitalize your sentences correctly if you want to offer to help.
Anonymous you would use number one when saying something like today, it's three years..
Anonymousnumber two is more of a general statemenet saying how long it has been in the past instead of saying what today is. Overall they mean pretty much the same thing.
# 2 is not a general statement. It is the only grammatically correct form for the posted question.
Any time when we use the "since" construction to refer to something back in time, the present perfect is the only correct construction.e.g. It's been 3 years since I saw a movie in the theater. " It is 3 years since....." is ungrammatical.
grammarfreakAny time when we use the "since" construction to refer to something back in time, the present perfect is the only correct construction.e.g. It's been 3 years since I saw a movie in the theater. " It is 3 years since....." is ungrammatical.
I wouldn't be so quick to discard it. As far as I know, "It is X years since..." is not uncommon in British English.
ozzourti "It is X years since..." is not uncommon in British English.
I think we are discussing main-stream English, by that I mean English recognized as commonly accepted and deemed grammatical, am I on the right path here ? This particular pattern in discussion is not used for all I know, nor I hear natives spoken that way living in California for over 30 years. I am not disputing your comment. It may be accpeted as common English in England. I am responding as a Californian.
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grammarfreakI think we are discussing main-stream English, by that I mean English recognized as commonly accepted and deemed grammatical,
I wouldn't say that British English is not commonly accepted or deemed ungrammatical. Would you?
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