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The I in "It's I." is a subject complement. Subject complements are used only with a class of verbs called linking verbs, of which to be is the most common. Unlike object complements, subject complements are not affected by the action of the verb, and they describe or explain the subject. In this case, I is not affected by the action of the verb is, and it specifies exactly who the subject It is. The subject complement therefore takes the subjective case. Usually, this makes no difference in the sentence because English nouns no longer distinguish between subjective and objective case. But English pronouns make the distinction, and the subject complement takes I instead of me. It's I sounds strange to many English speakers, but is considered correct by prescriptivists. In other contexts, the subject complement may sound less strange, such as "This is she" rather than "This is her."

At this point, the use of the subjective in the subject complement has almost entirely disappeared. Both usages are still current, but the use of subjective in the subject complement is much less common.

It should be noted that the use of a nominative complement ("It is I") is by no means universal in other languages. For example, French-speakers say "c'est moi" (it's me) not "c'est je".

Which one is most commonly used for formal and informal? BrE ok Emotion: smile
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Did you mean you want only responses about BrE?
I think "it's me" is gaining popularity in both AmE and BrE.
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I meant, I need answers in BrE Emotion: stick out tongue
I'm not a BrE native, but I think "it's me!" is widely accepted in BrE.

On the other hand, whereas the expression "c'est moi qui etc..." is correct in French (I'm French speaking), the BrE (and AmE too, I guess) would rather say "I'm the one who...", or "I (accented) did x or Y".
Yea that's in French hoever in Spanish 'soy yo' literally means It's I just like what the prescriptivists told as in above statement Emotion: tongue tied Anyway, it's alright to write either one, am I correct?
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There was a survey done by Norman Lewis decades ago, asking nine different groups of people whether they accept nineteen particular sentences and their usage. One of the senteces was "It is me." Here's the results:

ACCEPTALBE ENGLISH: Acceptance, 62 percent.
Seventy-seven percent of the professors, 75 percent of the lexicographers, and almost 82 percent of the authors accepted this popular "violation" of strict grammatical rule. The majority of Harper's subscribers, newspaper writers, and women's magazine editors, however, rejected it. Among the high school teachers the vote was close: 17 for, 15 against.


I'd believe the usage has become sufficiently current even among educated English speakers.
HMLithmanYea that's in French hoever in Spanish 'soy yo' literally means It's I just like what the prescriptivists told as in above statement Emotion: tongue tied Anyway, it's alright to write either one, am I correct?

I think "it's me!" would be more normal...
HMLithmanIt should be noted that the use of a nominative complement ("It is I") is by no means universal in other languages. For example, French-speakers say "c'est moi" (it's me) not "c'est je".
"C'est moi". This "moi" is not necessarily an equivalent to English "me".

"Moi" (I, me), "toi" (you, you), "lui" (he, him), "elle" (she, her), "soi" (it, it), "nous" (we, us), "vous" (you, you), "eux" (they, them), "elles" (they, them) are called "disjunctive pronoun" and they work sometimes as nominative and sometimes as objective.

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