It seems to be, but maybe I'm wrong that 'really' gets used a lot as an adjective and perhaps more by British speakers than U.S. ones.

"A really good looking girl". - the girl isn't looking at anything.

"A really hot day".
"That was a really enjoyable evening".
"A really honest man".
All the above seem adjectival to me so any pointers would be appreciated.
Mike
It seems to be, but maybe I'm wrong that 'really' gets used a lot as an adjective and perhaps more ... really enjoyable evening". "A really honest man". All the above seem adjectival to me so any pointers would be appreciated.

One function of adverbs is to qualify/modify adjectives. That's what "really" is doing in your sample sentences: "good looking" etc are adjectives qualified by "really".
Alan Jones
It seems to be, but maybe I'm wrong that 'really' gets used a lot as an adjective and perhaps more ... really enjoyable evening". "A really honest man". All the above seem adjectival to me so any pointers would be appreciated.

An adjective modifies a noun.
In your examples, "really" doesn't modify nouns. "A really man, a really day, a really girl, a really evening." All of these are nonsense combinations.
As Alan says, the word "really" is an adverb. It qualifies or modifies a verb (or an adjective, or another adverb).
"Really good-looking, really honest, really hot, really enjoyable" In this sense, "really" means "very" and quantifies or modifies the other adjectivees.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
It seems to be, but maybe I'm wrong that 'really' ... seem adjectival to me so any pointers would be appreciated.

One function of adverbs is to qualify/modify adjectives. That's what "really" is doing in your sample sentences: "good looking" etc are adjectives qualified by "really". Alan Jones

I've always thought of 'really' as 'without a doubt' or 'undoubtably'. So;
"Undoubtably, a good looking girl".
"A hot day,without a doubt".
"That was an enjoyable evening, without a doubt".
"A honest man, without a doubt".
(snip)

Is there any other kind? You're either honest, or you're not.
(snip) Is there any other kind? You're either honest, or you're not.

I will probably get this wrong, but I think that on "Mark Twain Tonight (an LP record album) Twain is quoted as having "met a really honest lawyer he kept his hands in his own pockets".
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
(snip)
I will probably get this wrong, but I think that on "Mark Twain Tonight (an LP record album) Twain is quoted as having "met a really honest lawyer he kept his hands in his own pockets".

According to Boswell, "Johnson observed that 'he did not care to speak ill of any man behind his back, but he believed that the gentleman was an attorney' "
With best wishes,
Peter.

Peter Young, (BrE), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004. (US equivalent: Attending Anesthesiologist)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK.
Now happily retired.
(snip)

I will probably get this wrong, but I think that ... really honest lawyer he kept his hands in his own pockets".

According to Boswell, "Johnson observed that 'he did not care to speak ill of any man behind his back, but he believed that the gentleman was an attorney' "

LOL. I have to get out the old LP and listen again. In one of his speeches,Twain said, after a short list of disagreable qualities/nationalities, "He (or It) is French."
(snip) Is there any other kind? You're either honest, or you're not.

I'm usually honest but not always honest. If I'm very tempted I succumb but if I'm only tempted a little I can say quite honestly, that I'm honest.
My friend doesn't even give in when he is very tempted; he's really honest.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.