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It seems odd to me that a house-holder should have the responsibility for clearing snow off council property.

We should go further. From 2005 all householders will be required to make snowmen. Precariously positioned snowheads are forbidden. Free nose-carrots will be distributed to the poor.
R.
It seems odd to me that a house-holder should have the responsibility for clearing snow off council property.

We should go further. From 2005 all householders will be required to make snowmen. Precariously positioned snowheads are forbidden. Free nose-carrots will be distributed to the poor.

Now that's just ridiculous. Snowmen require small lumps of coal for eyes. Any programs or schemes to promote snowman construction will be vigorously opposed by the Greens, Save-Our-Fossil-Fuel members, and the WARTS (Windmills Are Really The Solution). Additional world-wide calls for the use of coal lumps might result in George Bush deciding that Wales needs the protection of the United States.

Additional uses for coal will result in additional references to coal. It's axiomatic that there will be a flurry of lawsuits brought by people that find "black as coal" and "coal black" racist and offensive. Women's rights organizations will protest that the use of "lumps of coal" lessens the seriousness of their calls for breast cancer screening programs.
I don't even want to get into that carrot thing. Go peddle your pro-NAFTA propaganda elsewhere. What you are suggesting is that more and more jobs be taken from real Americans and moved down to the Mexican carrot growing farms where people work for six cents a day.

I suppose you are also an advocate of more Snow Angels and other faith-based wintertime activities. You just have to bring religion into everything, don't you?
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Now that's just ridiculous. Snowmen require small lumps of coal for eyes. Any programs or schemes to promote snowman construction ... the use of coal lumps might result in George Bush deciding that Wales needs the protection of the United States.

You're right to bring up this incredibly crucial issue. Look at it from the viewpoint of the snowman on the Clapham nivibus. Coal used for eyes gets soggy.
Soggy coal does not burn. Burnt coal leads to
global warming. And if there's anything a snowman
hates, it's that. But, by extreme good fortune, we English are set for another ice age.
R.
There is only one teenager in my close, to my knowledge, and I wouldn't want him anywhere near my property.

That sentence stopped me cold. I had thought I understood the British meaning of 'close' that is not included in ... or to a court at the back of a building.' Now Robin's sentence makes sense to me. Tricky things, words.

We used the term 'cul-de-sac' (without the hyphens) when I was a kid, but 'close' seems to be used in street naming, and I hear it used more often down here.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
We used the term 'cul-de-sac' (without the hyphens) when I was a kid, but 'close' seems to be used in street naming, and I hear it used more often down here.

To be understood as "closed"?
If so, how to account for the absent "d"? Older form, perhaps.

R.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It seems odd to me that a house-holder should have the responsibility for clearing snow off council property.

We should go further. From 2005 all householders will be required to make snowmen. Precariously positioned snowheads are forbidden. Free nose-carrots will be distributed to the poor.

Does size matter?
Mike

M.J.Powell
We should go further. From 2005 all householders will be ... are forbidden. Free nose-carrots will be distributed to the poor.

Now that's just ridiculous. Snowmen require small lumps of coal for eyes. Any programs or schemes to promote snowman construction ... the use of coal lumps might result in George Bush deciding that Wales needs the protection of the United States.

That's all right provided that we lose the war.
Mike

M.J.Powell
We used the term 'cul-de-sac' (without the hyphens) when I ... naming, and I hear it used more often down here.

To be understood as "closed"? If so, how to account for the absent "d"? Older form, perhaps.

It's a very old word, in its related meanings. M-W.com has stopped saying how old, but it does give:
Main Entry: 3close
Pronunciation: 'klOs, U.S. also 'klOz
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English clos, literally,
enclosure, from Old French clos, from Latin clausum, from neuter of clausus, past participle

1 a : an enclosed area b chiefly British : theprecinct of a cathedral

2 chiefly British a : a narrow passage leading froma street to a court and the houses within or to the common stairway of tenements b : a road closed at
one end

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That sentence stopped me cold. I had thought I understood ... Now Robin's sentence makes sense to me. Tricky things, words.

We used the term 'cul-de-sac' (without the hyphens) when I was a kid, but 'close' seems to be used in street naming, and I hear it used more often down here.

There are many more closes than there used to be round here. This is because of the amount of infilling that has taken place: when an older property with a significant garden is demolished and several houses are shoe-horned in to the gap, it makes little commercial sense to provide two exits, even if the gap could link two existing streets or be constructed as a crescent with two exits on to the same street.

The naming of closes can amuse: I frequently pass Howe Close and I've been told of a Knott Close in another part of the country.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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