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The naming of closes can amuse: I frequently pass Howe Close and I've been told of a Knott Close in another part of the country.

Does Glenn Close exist?

Christopher
(Change 3032 to 3232 to reply by private e-mail)
The naming of closes can amuse: I frequently pass Howe Close and I've been told of a Knott Close in another part of the country.

Does Glenn Close exist?

Yes, but no cigar.
Howcum, if she's a woman (and I have little doubt of that), her name is Glenn?

Bob Lieblich
Inquiring mind
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Does Glenn Close exist?

Yes, but no cigar.

Shucks! Foiled again!
Howcum, if she's a woman (and I have little doubt of that), her name is Glenn?

It's Scottish/Celtic/Gaelic ('gleann') meaning 'valley', at least as far as I can ascertain. Presumably a female valley.

Christopher
(Change 3032 to 3232 to reply by private e-mail)
Yes, but no cigar. Howcum, if she's a woman (and I have little doubt of that), her name is Glenn?

Glendalteration?
R.
To be understood as "closed"? If so, how to account for the absent "d"? Older form, perhaps.

It's a very old word, in its related meanings. M-W.com has stopped saying how old, but it does give: Main ... court and the houses within or to the common stairway of tenements b : a road closed at one end

It was used in street names as early as 1723, according to the OED:

close, n.

4. c. A short street closed at one end, a cul-de-sac.Often in proper names of such streets.
1723 DEFOE Life Col. Jacque (ed. 2) 70, I..cut intoLittle-Britain, so into Bartholomew-Close, then cross Aldersgate-street.
The "narrow passage" sense goes all the way back to c. 1400.
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Now that's just ridiculous. Snowmen require small lumps of coal ... deciding that Wales needs the protection of the United States.

That's all right provided that we lose the war.

What kind of patriot are you? You're willing to lose the war for a few billions of dollars in aid money and a free trip to Guantanamo Bay?
Oh, well. I guess it's not unusual for a Welshman to not worry about the green green grass of home. Too busy writing a letter to Lucille thinking she's a lady. So, what's new, pussycat?
snip
Main Entry: 3close Pronunciation: 'klOs, U.S. also 'klOz Function: noun ... of tenements b : a road closed at one end

It was used in street names as early as 1723, according to the OED: close, n. 4. c. A short ... into Little-Britain, so into Bartholomew-Close, then cross Aldersgate-street. The "narrow passage" sense goes all the way back to c. 1400.

I suppose it was named 'close' because the houses were close on each side...
Mike

M.J.Powell
What kind of patriot are you? You're willing to lose the war for a few billions of dollars in aid money and a free trip to Guantanamo Bay?

The money's OK, and according to a recent inmate of Guantanamo it is quite pleasant there.
Oh, well. I guess it's not unusual for a Welshman to not worry about the green green grass of home.

Hehe! The TV company I was then working for made a film about his home town, particularly the more grotty bits, and played it with 'Green, Green Grass' as a backing.
They stoned our vehicles the next time we went there.
Too busy writing a letter to Lucille thinking she's a lady. So, what's new, pussycat?

Lucille?
Mike

M.J.Powell
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It's Scottish/Celtic/Gaelic ('gleann') meaning 'valley', at least as far as I can ascertain. Presumably a female valley.

Yeah, Cleavage Close just doesn't have the same ring to it, does it?

Dena Jo
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