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The problem is not the snow, it's the other traffic.

In particular, the several generations of drivers who've grown up without having learnt how to drive in snow. Aaargh ...

One year's driving in Thule, Greenland, fixed that for me.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Evan:

For a little snow? (And, yes, I know whereof I speak. Looking at your forecast, your expecting a total accumulation of 4-8 inches.

We had school. And we didn't even get 4-8. The reports were exaggerated, as usual. How come when I came to Massachusetts, NJ started getting heavier/more snow than MA? It makes *no* sense!

The colder it gets, the less it snows. In Thule (that's in Greenland) it hardly ever actually snows it just blows the snow horizontally off the permanent icecap. When the wind blows at 80 mph, that's a dizzying sight! During those conditions (they call them "phases") we were restricted to our barracks. There was plenty of food stored in our barracks at all times. That was poker-playing time!
http://www.geocities.com/opus731/thule.html

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Edward: HOW is that funny? Someone, please explain. I don't see how this is just *my* ignorance!

He who laughs last is the last to catch on.

You just got zinged!

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
He who laughs last is the last to catch on.

You just got zinged!

That was meant for Joey. Sorry.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
No snow yet in Oxford. I think all this bad ... doing very much, the forecasts can be spun (hi, Philip!).

Er, I take it all back. During the last five minutes a white-out has occurred, the wind has blown great ... up my study window and there is thunder and lightning to boot. The suddenness of this blizzard is quite startling.

I noticed one of those outdoor temperature signs on the way home tonight. It's 54 F tonight! I'm glad I have my cozy new bomber jacket.
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For a little snow? (And, yes, I know whereof I ... five feet. O'Hare airport closed, but not my high school.)

In Riga, snow was never the cause of school closings, but temperatures below -30 degrees Celsius were (-22deg. F). That ... school. I don't know what the other schools did. I attended those in Germany and the USA under warmer conditions.

In elementary school in Chicago they tended to close a few days a year. I suspect that the main reason was that the teachers weren't going to be able to make it, and so what would they do with the kids? We apparently never go much colder than that. (The Chicago records are -20°F in December, -24°F for January (in 1985, after I had left), and -12°F in February (zero in November and March). I have pretty clear memories of being told to bundle up when walking to school because it had reached (or was expected to reach) the magic temperature of -25°, at which any exposed skin will get at least mild frostbite. (Probably an urban legend.) On second thought, I may be getting this mixed up with a wind chill of forty below, which I also remember.
To all you Canadians, Scandinavians, Buffalonians, and Gophers, I know "Big deal".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Whatever it is that the government
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >does, sensible Americans would preferPalo Alto, CA 94304 >that the government do it to somebody

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
I noticed one of those outdoor temperature signs on the way home tonight. It's 54 F tonight! I'm glad I have my cozy new bomber jacket.

The men and women of Maine are made of sterner stuff. I'd have sent you an invitation to visit me there had I known of your existence back then. You'd have frozen into a speechless lump within five minutes, not unthawing for decades to come. Glory Hallelujah!
Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
I noticed one of those outdoor temperature signs on the ... tonight! I'm glad I have my cozy new bomber jacket.

The men and women of Maine are made of sterner stuff. I'd have sent you an invitation to visit me ... back then. You'd have frozen into a speechless lump within five minutes, not unthawing for decades to come. Glory Hallelujah!

Charles, every single post of yours tonight mentions me. You're going to have to stop that or people will start telling us to get a room.
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I have a theory that every city subject to snow ... amount of snow, the calculation seems to be the same.

Agreed. In Britain there's another factor to bear in mind - the narrow and congested roads. Just a few incidents ... amount of equipment will help because it simply can't move. The problem is not the snow, it's the other traffic.

In eastern US cities the main streets are fairly wide, but the side streets are narrow: probably wider than British side streets, but only wide enough for the parked cars and one narrow lane of traffic. Typically the cities do a good job on keeping the main streets clear while the side streets of on their own. In Philadelphia they fit ploughs to garbage trucks for the major work, but there is no hope of getting into the side streets. That's what shovels are for.

As for traffic, the idea is to do the major ploughing at night, before the morning rush hour. Of course this depends upon the timing of the snow, but snow tends to fall at night. A couple of years ago a surprise snow storm started in Buffalo just before the evening rush hour. They were screwed.
Richard R. Hershberger
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