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(Doorbell ringing)

  • Who's it? ...Open the door, it's me!

  • Who's it? ...Open the door, it's us!

  • Who could it be? Maybe it's them. / It must be them.
I know I can say "it's me" and "it's us", but what about "It's them" and "It must be them"? Are the above structures possible?

Thank you.
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Kooyeen(Doorbell ringing)
  • Who's it? ...Open the door, it's me!
  • Who's it? ...Open the door, it's us!
  • Who could it be? Maybe it's them. / It must be them.
I know I can say "it's me" and "it's us", but what about "It's them" and "It must be them"? Are the above structures possible?

Thank you.

Not outside informal context.
Kooyeen(Doorbell ringing)

  • Who's it? ...Open the door, it's me!
  • Who's it? ...Open the door, it's us!
  • Who could it be? Maybe it's them. / It must be them.


  • I know I can say "it's me" and "it's us", but what about "It's them" and "It must be them"? Are the above structures possible?

    Thank you.

    "It's them" is only possible if "the expected visitors are known by the host", (that said, the host and the man along with the guests know whom they have been expecting to welcome"

    PS: Hey my friend friend! I'm not a native speaker. You better not take my comments into consideration without taking a native's advice!
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It's me. I am alone outside your door.

It's us. There is more than one person outside the door.

It's them. It is the people I am expecting.

They may not be 100% gramatical but they are the things that people say all the time. You'd sound a complete idiot grandly pronouncing 'It is I'.
Thanks you all!!!
Nona The BritThey may not be 100% gramatical but they are the things that people say all the time. You'd sound a complete idiot grandly pronouncing 'It is I'.

That's what I wanted somebody to say. Although you are a British English native speaker, I believe American English is the same in this case. I know "It is I" is grammatically correct, but it is unusual, sounds odd and, as you said, you'd sound an idiot pronouncing it. Thank you so much Nona.

Bye and take care.
The noun after the verb is to be in nominative case and not in accusative.
Nothwithstanding, in speech everybody puts the noun in accusative. (demise of the language)
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The noun after the verb is to be in nominative case and not in accusative.
I think you mean this to be true in the case of a pronoun after a linking verb only. Taking your "rule" literally, we must have

They invited we.

because the pronoun is after the verb, the conditions under which you say the pronoun must be nominative.

That aside, this "rule" is only a rule for those who persist in thinking of English as a language which must obey the rules of Latin.

In English, the rule is that pronouns are in the accusative whenever they are not the subject of a finite clause. Those who wish to speak Latin, coded into English words, will use the nominative pronouns after a linking verb. But why speak English with Latin grammar -- unless we wish to sound like idiots? Emotion: smile

CJ
Hi CJ

The reason some 'Latinists' may object to it's me is the fact that the verb to be is intransitive and thus can't take an object. Me, however, is generally known as the object form of I. They invited we is a different matter because invite is a transitive verb and can take an object. Don't get me wrong, though, I am all for it's me!Emotion: smile

"Pronouns are in the accusative whenever they are not the subject of a finite clause." In other words, he is as old as we is incorrect? Of course you have every right to think so, but the majority of serious grammarians disagree with you.

Cheers
CB
IMOEmotion: smile

He is as old as we = he is as old as we are old. (thus we is the subject of "as clause", as is a conj.)

He is as old as me (as is a prep)
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