+0

It's time he go home immediately.

Is the sentence above grammatical? And if so, could it be classified as a subjunctive mandative construction?

+0
tkacka15It's time he go home immediately.

I'd accept it as a borderline case. The traditional injunction is to use the past: It's time he went home immediately.

In either case it is definitely a mandative construction.

(I'm familiar with the classification (present) subjunctive and the classification mandative construction, but not with the combination subjunctive mandative construction. Is that really "a thing"?)

CJ

+0
tkacka15It's time he go home immediately.

To me, this is highly strained, to the point where I would not accept it as correct in ordinary modern English. It could be that AmE is slightly more accepting of this form than BrE.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  
GPYIt could be that AmE is slightly more accepting of this form than BrE.

I think you can safely attribute the acceptance of this form to me personally (and I did say "borderline"). In this case I can't say that I am representative of Americans in general.

Emotion: smile
CJ

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
CalifJim(I'm familiar with the classification (present) subjunctive and the classification mandative construction, but not with the combination subjunctive mandative construction. Is that really "a thing"?)

Indeed, it's a pleonasm. I've been superfluous with words. By the way, is it natural to say: "I've committed a pleonasm"?

tkacka15is it natural to say: "I've committed a pleonasm"?

No. Well, not to my ear anyway.

CJ

CalifJimI think you can safely attribute the acceptance of this form to me personally (and I did say "borderline"). In this case I can't say that I am representative of Americans in general.

I had in mind that in some previous discussions we have said that the present subjunctive (e.g. "it is important that he go", "I insist that he go", etc.) is more common in AmE than BrE, so I wondered whether something similar could be true in this case.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
GPYI wondered whether something similar could be true in this case.

Got it. No, the case of "It's (high / about) time that" shouldn't be grouped with "important" and "insist", etc. for the purposes of understanding American English constructions. My impression is that we're all over the place with what we think should go after "It's time", even though the Ngrams app strongly suggests that it's always "It's time he went", i.e., the past, in published works.

CJ