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What does the following sentence mean?

It's not the years, it's the mileage.
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We'll assume that you are asking this in reference to a car or some kind of vehicle with wheels.

When people shop for a used car, they are usually more concerned about its mileage (how far the car has travelled since it was built, according to its odometer) than about its age in years. For example:

If you were to buy a used car, which one would you prefer?
a 10-year old car that has 20,001 miles on it
or
a 2-year old car that has 112,062 miles on it

Having said that, people also apply this principle to other things.
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And if it's being used metaphorically, it's not the age of the person that is important, but rather how much experience that person has.
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It's not the years that counts (it's important), it's the mileage (that counts).
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thank you, everyone.
but if that were true then experience would not count for much since a lot of experience would = mega mileage and a lot of mileage is nothing to be proud of
Anonymousbut if that were true then experience would not count for much since a lot of experience would = mega mileage and a lot of mileage is nothing to be proud of
Hi Anon,

Unlike car mileage which devalues the car as it piles up, the more brain mileage we acquire, the more mature and sophisticate we become.

Best Regards,
Hoa Thai
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As with a car, it's not the age that causes creeking and worn out parts, but the mileage; what a person has been through.
Creaking
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