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Hello.
Which is the proper tense/expression to use in this context?

A: Do you want a cup of coffee?
B: No, thanks. I've already had one.
B: No, thanks. I already have one.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
i've already had one. Present perfect for past event with present relevance.
thank you so much
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CalifJimActually, you haven't described the context completely, but I can fill that in for you. A: Do you want a cup of coffee? (B has a cup of coffee right in front of him.) B: No, thanks. I already have one. A: Do you want a cup of coffee? (B is not drinking anything at the moment. However, earlier he drank some coffee.) B: No, thanks. I've already had one. CJ
Hi, CalifJim,

When will you use the sentence "No, thanks. I already had one." (in what context) ?

Thank you.
yyfroyWhen will you use the sentence "No, thanks. I already had one." (in what context) ?
A: The flu season is supposed to be really bad this year and it will start early. They are giving flu shots at the clinic right now. Go and get one.
B. I already had one. Did you get yours?
AlpheccaStars,
AlpheccaStarsA: The flu season is supposed to be really bad this year and it will start early. They are giving flu shots at the clinic right now. Go and get one.B. I already had one. Did you get yours?
Thanks for your reply.

But I wonder if there might be a situation in the "Do you want a cup of coffee" context that I could answer with "No, thanks. I already had one."

Can you tell me, please? Thanks.
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yyfroy"Do you want a cup of coffee" context that I could answer with "No, thanks. I already had one."
It is not wrong, grammatically speaking.

In normal situations, the most idiomatic response uses the present perfect tense, because the responder wants to bring a very recent completed event (drinking a cup of coffee) to present attention. The adverb "already" means that it happened recently.

One possible scenario is this, but the word "already" is not applicable.
A: Do you want a cup of coffee?
B: No thanks, I had one a week ago, and it interfered with my heart medicine. I nearly died of the palpitations.
AlpheccaStars,

Thank you very much for your clear explanation!

So if I say

I already have had coffee - it means I have one at the moment I'm speaking (past perfect tense)

I have already had one - it means in a recent past I had coffee. (past simple tense)

Is that right?

Thanks


Jamile (I'm an English teacher)

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B.

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