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Hello, when I was playing a videogame I've found a sentence whose structure I cannot figure out. The sentence goes like this. "Both sides now crippled beyond repair,the remnants of their armies continue to battle on ravaged planets,their hatred fueled by over four thousand years of total war." I know what this means,but I think the first and the third sentences are little bit strange.I think there should be some verbs. Are there any verbs omitted?How do you think? Any suggestion will help me much.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Mister MicawberYes, but what does this mean?-- "Your discussion is contributive." It seems rather pompous.
Sorry, it is a wrong word.

I meant your discussion is contributory a lot to my study.

Sometimes, my cheap and small dictionary is misleading.
dimsumexpress perhaps, " the sleeping man was swept away..." makes more sense.
Exactly my point. And "sleeping" is not a past participle, nor does it imply a passive connotation.
"To sleep" doesn't have a transitive use (except Jim's "This cabin sleeps six.").
I was feebly trying to argue that adjectives are not derived from verbs with only intransitive uses. (Jim will probably come up with 50.) Therefore all potential adjective uses carry the "passive connotation" implication.
So it seems strange to me to enlist this non-finite use of a finite concept (passive voice) in rejecting these past participles as adjectives.

I know I'm not making any sense. This is full of holes. Emotion: rofl

I'll admit that in "Attacked, the US entered the war," "attacked" doesn't make it as an adjective. Emotion: embarrassed
(I'm not exactly sure at this point that I was arguing it does.) Emotion: thinking

Later. I'm going for a long walk in the pouring rain to try to clear my head. - A.
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Avangi,
You are too profound for me. I have to admit, I got a bit lost.
Maybe I am worng, but I will sum it up this way. Not all past participles are capabable of being verbal adjectives, such as "slept man". To me, by its pure nature,past participle adjectives are passive. "He was embarrassed ....", many view "embarrassed" as adjective (verbal). Some simply look at this as passive. It can go either way.

Past participles can be used to form adverbial clauses. That's all I can say.Emotion: geeked
dimsumexpress I got a bit lost.
The fault is mine, not yours.
"Profound" is not the word for it. How about "abstruse"?
Thanks for bearing with me.
AnonymousThe only supply of ammunition having been severed, the American troops held on to the front line and decided not to retreat.
The grammar is great, but as an aside, the logic seems topsy-turvy.
We'd normally use this structure in such a way that the non-finite clause logically supports the conclusion.
Your sentence makes it sound as if the severing of the supply line was the reason they decided not to retreat.
Of course, that may be. The enemy may have also severed the line of retreat.
But if so, you need to say so.

In itself, running out of ammo is an excellent reason to retreat, if possible.
(Well, I'm not much of a war fighter.) Emotion: shake

Out of fuel, they decided to continue on foot.

Not, Out of fuel, they decided to keep driving.
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My original intention is that the non-finite clause of the sentence is concessive.

I seldom see such a relation of a non-finite clause with its main clause. That's why I asked this question.

Is there a problem if a non-finite adverbial clause is in concessive relation with its main clause?

Have you seen such an example before?
Anon,
I am curious. What is "concessive relation" ? And how would you use it in a setence. Please give an example. You are using vauge and none standard terms which make it helping you difficult..
AnonymousHello, when I was playing a videogame I've found a sentence whose structure I cannot figure out. The sentence goes like this. "Both sides now crippled beyond repair,the remnants of their armies continue to battle on ravaged planets,their hatred fueled by over four thousand years of total war." I know what this means,but I think the first and the third sentences are little bit strange.I think there should be some verbs. Are there any verbs omitted?How do you think? Any suggestion will help me much.

They do have verbs. In very simple terms, the clauses in blue are adjuncts (optional adverbials) - specifically, they are non-finite clauses with "crippled", and "fueled" as verbs. They are optional because if they are removed the sentence will still retain its core meaning (in black). This kind of verb (usually ending in -ed) is called a past-participle, so the clauses containing them are, logically, called past-participial clauses. If you'd like that explained in more detail, put in another post.

BillJ
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AnonymousIs the non-finite clause below correct?
The only supply of ammunition having been severed, the American troops held on to the front line and decided not to retreat.
AnonymousMy original intention is that the non-finite clause of the sentence is concessive.
I seldom see such a relation of a non-finite clause with its main clause. That's why I asked this question.
Is there a problem if a non-finite adverbial clause is in concessive relation with its main clause?
Have you seen such an example before?
If I understand your questions, I'm not exactly sure how to convert a finite concessive subordinate clause into one which is non-finite.
It seems to me that the choice of conjunction is critical, and unfortunately the non-finite version has no conjunction. (You seem to be aware of all of this.)

finite version:
Although the only supply of ammunition had been severed, the American troops . . . . . decided not to retreat.

The subordinate clause is clearly concessive.

Since the only supply of ammunition had been severed, they decided not to retreat.
This one is clearly not concessive, and has the curious twist in logic which I objected to in your original.
The only difference is in the conjunction.

I suppose in some cases, context could make the non-finite version consessive. I'll have to think about it.

By the way, I think it's safe to say that "concessive" qualifies as a standardterm. Emotion: nodding

Best wishes, - A.
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