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Hello, when I was playing a videogame I've found a sentence whose structure I cannot figure out. The sentence goes like this. "Both sides now crippled beyond repair,the remnants of their armies continue to battle on ravaged planets,their hatred fueled by over four thousand years of total war." I know what this means,but I think the first and the third sentences are little bit strange.I think there should be some verbs. Are there any verbs omitted?How do you think? Any suggestion will help me much.
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The sentence is fine. 'Crippled' and 'fueled' are parts of nonfinite clauses.
"Both sides now (1) crippled beyond repair,the remnants of their armies continue to battle on (2) ravaged planets,their hatred (3) fueled by over four thousand years of total war."

(1) Crippled - is a past participle used in an adverbial clause construction.
(2) Ravaged - is also a past particple used as a verbal adjective.
(3) Fueled - same as (1). Note that this constuction has an implied passive connotation.
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dimsumexpressthis constuction has an implied passive connotation
It seems that if the author wanted to say "Both sides now having been crippled beyond repair," or "Both sides have now been crippled beyond repair, and etc.," he would do so.
I think the default verb is "are." "Both sides now are crippled beyond repair."
If you delete the "beyond repair," and say
"Both sides now crippled, the remnants of their armies continue to battle on," "crippled" is just another adjective.

Both sides now tired, they decided to quit. Does "tired" have an implied passive connotation?
Did somebody tire them out, or did they tire themselves out?

I suppose it would be possible to say that any adjective which has a corresponding verb form has a passive connotation - an implied agent. Now alert, the men fought valiantly. (Someone/something alerted them.)

Best wishes, - A.
Hi Avangi,
We had previously discussed the use of past participle in an adverbial construction. I still hold my belief strongly that this form of usage has a passive nature for which you seemed to have disagree. For the pure joy of learning, I'd say this. Different people see the same object at a different angle will have a different depiction. Consider these sentences:
Attacked by the Japanes in 1941, the United States officially entered the war with the Japanse.

Neglected and weathered by the elements, the church is in needs of repairs.

Exhausted their supplies and weakened, the explorers finally decided to call for rescue.

If one chose to call the past participles "adjectives", I would say it is incorrect with this construction.

However, " I am a tired man" , " He looks worn", then I agree. Anyway, just a few more cents to my previous comments.
dimsumexpressHe looks worn
Yuletide greetings! Emotion: happy
As a complement to a copular verb, a participle is surely an adjective.
As I've repeated monotonously, many participles have served their apprenticeship and become full-fledged adjectives, with their own dictionary listings.
I seem to recall that you reject all adjective uses of "to be" plus past participle.

It strikes me as a waste of time to single out certain past participle uses as having an implied passive connotation, when this is the very reason we use them as adjectives. They imply an actor.
There are probably exceptions, but you can't make an adjective from the past participle of a verb which has no transitive use.
The slept man was swept away by the tide.
In many of your examples, you actually state the agent: "by [the actor]."

Sorry, this is a bit incoherent. I just feel like something is wrong here.
You're probably right.
"The cornered man surrendered." is a lot different from "Cornered, the man surrendered."
But in my opinion, they both have an implied passive connotation.
(In the first one, "cornered" is an adjective; in the second one, "cornered" is a clause.)

- A.
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Season's Greetings,

<<< "The cornered man surrendered." is a lot different from "Cornered, the man surrendered."
But in my opinion, they both have an implied passive connotation.
(In the first one, "cornered" is an adjective; in the second one, "cornered" is a clause.)>>>

In the above, "cornered " is indeed a participle adjective which fits the passive natural as I described.
"Surrendered" , on the other hand, can only be a past tense verb and can't be an adjective.

We can keep going with the possibility of past participle use and definition, and may not arrive to the same analytical answer as our approaches are different. That said, " The slept man was swept sway by the tide", this sounds odd to me. "slept " is in no way acting as an adjective, if that the intent.

We have to keep in mind, not all the past participles can be used as adjectives. So perhaps, " the sleeping man was swept away..." makes more sense.
It's me again.

Is the non-finite clause below correct?

The only supply of ammunition having been severed, the American troops held on to the front line and decided not to retreat.

Your discussion is contributive.
Yes, but what does this mean?-- "Your discussion is contributive." It seems rather pompous.
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