+0
Jake walked slowly so as to let his girlfriend catch up to/with him.

Do both to and with fit in the above context and mean about the same? Thanks.
1 2
Comments  
Hi,

Yeah.

Clive
Angliholicto let his girlfriend catch up to/with him.
Personally I have never heard "catch up to him".

"Catch up with him" is a common error in this context. I would say: "so she could catch him up". "Catch up with someone" means to talk to them about what has happened in the interim period... or that something has a damaging effect on someone: "the past caught up with him". (Source: OED)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Bokeh, I think you are thinking about an entirely different meaning of "catch up."

This is a physical closing of the distance. When the lead runner stumbled, the runner in second place was able to catch up to him, and eventually passed him, winning the race.

Or, as the OP said, he slowed down so she could catch up to him.
Grammar GeekBokeh, I think you are thinking about an entirely different meaning of "catch up."

This is a physical closing of the distance. When the lead runner stumbled, the runner in second place was able to catch up to him, and eventually passed him, winning the race.

Or, as the OP said, he slowed down so she could catch up to him.

Thanks, my dear friends.

Got it!

As an aside, what does "OP" refer to?
Original Poster - i.e., you!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Grammar GeekBokeh, I think you are thinking about an entirely different meaning of "catch up."
Hi GG. "Catch up to" is not BrE and not in the OED. Maybe it's an American thing ;-)

According to the OED:
Catch up: "succeed in reaching a person who is ahead of one".
Catch up with: "talk to someone whom one has not seen for some time in order to find out what they have been doing in the interim".
Catch someone up: "succeed in reaching a person who is ahead of one".
How do you say, in British English, that someone "closed the distance" when one person was ahead?

Think the tortoise and the hare. What do you say the tortoise did when he got to where the hare is? We say he caught up to the hare.

Here are random examples that came up in a Google search.

So Guiliani has caught up to Romney in New Hampshire -

Has Microsoft accounting caught up to QuickBooks?

The present has not caught up to the future.

Have you noticed that the NFC seems to have caught up to the AFC?

Police catch up to Utah prison escapee

Yanks can't catch up to Mets
Grammar GeekHow do you say, in British English, that someone "closed the distance" when one person was ahead?
Hi GG,

Many people would say "caught up with", but it's not what the OED says. I've not heard "caught up to" before but there are a lot of cases where we use different prepositions this side of the pond. In many cases the American choice has replaced (or started to replace) the typical British choice.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more