Has there been a thread on this? He's all over the news. Taking liberties and maybe downright lying about his drub addictions.

Now the thing that matters to me (and I am obviously too lazy to look this up) but is his book categorized as fiction or nonfiction? That matters. And Ovum, Oprah is involved.
Now another thing. The guy (too lazy to look up his name) who wrote Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (based on real events) fictionalized some of it and even created a journalist who comes to town. The book and the movie are a success but I was reading an interview with him (he has a new book). Wait, I'm going to look him up. John Berendt is his name. About Venice - his new book. Anyway the article says he is still smarting because he was not considered for a Pulitzer (evidently, he almost was) for "Garden" but was declined because he took liberties and made up a character and maybe played with the facts a bit.
Fiction or Nonfiction. What are the rules?
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Now the thing that matters to me (and I am obviously too lazy to look this up) but is his book categorized as fiction or nonfiction? That matters. And Ovum, Oprah is involved.

A Million Little Pieces is considered non-fiction. At Borders it is shelved in the Addiction/Recovery section. The "autobiographical" sequel, My Friend Leonard, is shelved in Literature (as are most literary biographies). We were contemplating a discredited authors' display earlier featuring Doris Kearns Goodwin, Forrest Carter (The Education of Little Tree), Jayson Blair, Stephen Ambrose, J.T. Leroy, etc.
Oprah is pooh-poohing it all, but she's got to be ***.

Paula
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Tonight on NEWSHOUR:
Telling Stories
Jeffrey Brown reports on accusations that author James Frey fabricated part of his memoir, "A Million Little Pieces."
Then, Brown discusses who has the burden of truth in the book publishing world with Karen Holt, deputy editor for Publishers Weekly, a magazine that covers books and the book industry.
Has there been a thread on this? He's all over the news. Taking liberties and maybe downright lying about his ... and made up a character and maybe played with the facts a bit. Fiction or Nonfiction. What are the rules?

Dramatic license allowed Shakespeare to play fast and loose with history in "Richard III." But "Richard III" stands on its own as a dramatic work. Pieces like MLP or Lorenzo Carcaterra's allegedly autobiographical "Sleepers" rely greatly on the pretense that they are true to generate interest.

As to what to do about such literary fraud, revoke the writer's dramatic license and attach an interlock device to his computer.
Dramatic license allowed Shakespeare to play fast and loose with history in "Richard III." But "Richard III" stands on its ... what to do about such literary fraud, revoke the writer's dramatic license and attach an interlock device to his computer.

Nah. To draw and quarter the bastards would be a lot more fun!
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Has there been a thread on this? He's all over the news. Taking liberties and maybe downright lying about his ... and made up a character and maybe played with the facts a bit. Fiction or Nonfiction. What are the rules?

According to imdb.com, Mr. Frey has writing credit on a screenplay on a movie called "Kissing the Fool", which has a date of 1998 on it, as well as another movie in the same year. So the screenplays for those movies, or the writing work he did on them to get writing credit on them, must have been written some time prior to 1998.
Now. I managed to read a couple dozen pages of AMLP, and it seems to me that the writing style implies that the person writing has brain damage or emotional damage, etc... it's a very "rough around the edges" writing style, and I don't understand how a person could, with a writing style like that, manage to not only get their screenplay accepted, but see the movie through to production as well twice.
It leads me to think that the choice of the writing style in A MIllion Little pieces was deliberate. It's not that he doesn't know how to write better, I can't see how it's possible that he doesn't - he's got a successful screenplay that's actually been made into a movie, and writing credits on a second movie. He's GOT to be able to write better than that. I have a hard time understanding how that writing style in the book could be anything else but deliberate.
Obviously, some of the events in the book have been disputed, no doubt. Mr. Frey even admits so much himself that there may have been some embellishments, etc... But what I haven't seen anyone bring up is the fact that this guy has got writing credits on two movies prior to the writing of this book - wikipedia mentions that Frey took out a second mortgage on his house and saved up money and set aside 12 months to write AMLP - this was after he already has seen two screenplays through to production.

It seems to me that the writing style is designed to make people think that the writer has brain damage or whatever. Certainly someone with a college degree and two screenplays seen through to production ought to be able to express themselves in a slightly more eloquent manner?

Disputing the events in one thing - but anyone can go to imdb.com and see that the writing ought to be better. The choice in writing style is deliberate - that much is almost completely obvious.

It's understandable that for someone who were functionally illiterrate - as many drug addicts are - or close to it, someone who didn't know how to spell, etc... someone like that would would want to tell their tale of addiction and recovery - in a case like this, a person like that might try their uneducated best to communicate in the most effective way.

Mr. Frey has a college education - he's far from illiterate.

However, his ability to see the big picture - his ability to cash in on something like this, his ability to reach millions of people with this "ride" of a book - he gets an A+ for that. That's a certain type of talent in itself, and in that sense, he's quite talented.

It's just that it's not sustainable, and so I question the intelligence behind such an approach. Hitchcock made movie after movie. There was nothing in any one of his movies that gave him away or prevented him from making another movie later on. Hitchcock had talent, and it was sustainable. One movie after another. The same thing could be said for Agatha Christie with her books, Edgar Allen Poe with his short stories, or a countless number of other artists - Andy Warhol with his artwork, Stevie Wonder with his songs, etc...
This controversy cuts to the heart of what it means to be creative - and the sacrifices that we have to make in order to remain creative. Perhaps, in that way, sacrifices that Janis Joplin, Bon Scott, Jim Morrison and so forth didn't make. But health concerns aside, I think that we ought to focus on the ability to express ourselves more, not less. Not a sudden burst of light and then a dying out like a shooting star - but a long-term commitment, a long-term pattern of sustainable creative expression.
What he's done is, in a way, a form of career suicide. And that's a loss, if he's really as talented as he appears to be. Or, perhaps "Leonard" wasn't with the mob, but with Hollywood instead? Who knows. But without even questioning the facts and the events, simply looking at the level of education, and the success as a screewriter ought to raise some questions concerning the forensic abyss that exists between the writing style used in AMLP and the background and education level of the author, as well as that author's demonstrated ability to see screenplays through to production.
According to imdb.com, Mr. Frey has writing credit on a screenplay on a movie called "Kissing the Fool", which has ... background and education level of the author, as well as that author's demonstrated ability to see screenplays through to production.

Thank you, Mr. Frey. Nice to have you with us.
Caroline
He has not talent at all beyond manipulating the emotions, yanking the heartstrings, jerking our chains, all for profit.
Which is exactly why his soulmate Oprah fell for it.
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